Wednesday, March 23, 2011

Isn't It Romantic?






by Donna MacMeans

A friend recently sent me an article on writing tips written by Michael Hauge. Now I adore Michael for his spot on advice, but it this one item - I think it's clearly wrong.

Michael says "One of the most clich├ęd, hackneyed, and least romantic things you can have your hero and love interest do is to dance together in a situation where no one else is dancing: when music from a party is playing inside a building and they’re outside; in a recording studio as a tune is being played back; on the deck of a cruise ship away from the orchestra. This misdemeanor is elevated to the level of felony if you have them dance in a situation where no music is playing at all, and they have to pretend to hear it."

(For the writers amongst us, the full text of the article is here: http://www.screenplaymastery.com/Misdemeanors.html )

I object! I strenuously object! And not just because I just wrote a scene in my work in process that has the hero and heroine dancing privately away from the crush in the ballroom (grin).

I object because I've done this in my life and it was immensely romantic. My husband and I danced outside on a wooden deck after rain forced an outdoor party complete with a live band inside at a house party. The rain had stopped. The air was fresh. The house was crammed with people listening to the band play, so we went outside to dance. The music could be heard through floor to ceiling windows that separated us from the interior. We were in full view of the people inside, but dancing outside felt intimate and highly romantic.

And rightly so. Who could forget that scene from Witness when Harrison Ford dances with Kelly McGinnis to the tunes from a car radio? Talk about sexual tension!


How about Jennifer Gray taking (or giving?) lessons from Patrick Swayze in Dirty Dancing in the privacy of his cabin while the phonograph spins another classic? (Or how about practising that lift in the lake?)

Perhaps the private dancing scene is overused in rejected screenplay submissions, but when it works - when the motivation is right and the tension finely drawn - it works!



I found this clip that shows some scenes from Sabrina and the fabulous Audrey Hepburn (sigh). Note the romantic dance on the tennis court. Take that Michael Hauge!


So how about you? Do you think dancing away from the crowd is romantic or cliched? Should I keep the scene in my work-in-process? Any personal stories to share? Any movies to illustrate your point? Let's talk dancing cheek-to-cheek.

74 comments:

Helen said...

Is he coming to ARRC2011 with me

Helen

jennifertanner said...

Donna...

Dancing away from the crowd is intensely romantic. I took dance lessons at Arthur Murray with my then husband so we could learn the foxtrot and not look like idiots for our first dance. I got real tired of listening to "A Kiss to Build a Dream On". Hubby has two left feet. I had to lead.

Congrats on the GR, Helen! Have fun!

Pink

Donna MacMeans said...

Well - I wish I were coming to AARC2011 with you. But the bird will have to do.

Helen said...

Well looks like the GR and I will be going to ARRC2011 in the morning I do hope he behaves himself although he will have Anna Barbara and myself to keep an eye on him LOL

Donna

Leave it in I agree there is something so romantic about a couple dancing on their own away from the crowds whether it be music from a car radio or just humming a tune I love it and have to agree that Hubby and I have done this a couple of times before we got married my house had a big front verandha and when he would leave off a night time saying good night was often a quick dance on the verandha without the front light LOL

So yes leave it in

I really need to go and pack I am off to Bondi in the morning not sure whether I will be able to drop in over the next few days I will try but I might not catch up till Monday evening and then I should have a new grnadson by then as well what a week it has been.

Have Fun
Helen

Donna MacMeans said...

Pink - I don't know what inspired Michael Hauge to write some an insipid thing! I agree - highly romantic. My husband and I took some ballroom lessons at the local community center so we wouldn't look stupid at a wedding we were to attend. My husband latched onto that box step - nothing else really took - but he knows the box step (grin).

Donna MacMeans said...

Another new grandbaby! It's the rooster flying your way, Helen, not a stork (grin). Have a great time. We'll expect a full report on your return.

Anna Campbell said...

Hey, Helen, looks like you've got a rooster coming to Bondi! You're having a good couple of days in the lair!

Donna, bah humbug to Mr. Hauge! I 100% agree with YOU!!!! Three words. SOUND OF MUSIC!!! Even as a little girl, my heart used to go pitter pat when the captain danced the Landler with Maria at the ball. It's when that simmering sexual tension between them finally becomes overt. Beautifully done! And I love your other examples too. Actually there's a lovely scene where the couple dance in Miss Potter too - SOOOOO romantic! Away with ye, Hauge. Ye speakest through thy hattest!

Anna Campbell said...

Wow, Helen, a new grandson as well!!!!

jennifertanner said...

Didn't Cary and Deborah Kerr dance under the stairs of the cruise ship in "An Affair to Remember"?

Pink

PJ said...

Leave it in, Donna! I agree with the others. While I've never done it in real life, I find it intensely romantic in movies I watch and books I read.

Anna, THE SOUND OF MUSIC is a perfect example! ::Sigh:: So romantic.

Helen, have a wonderful time this week! I know all your hard work will culminate in a simply fabulous conference!

Donna MacMeans said...

Pink - I just saw the ending to An Affair to Remember - the old black and white version - yesterday. Caught it just as Cary Grant spots her at the ballet in NY. What a great movie.

Donna MacMeans said...

Yay Anna - I'm glad you agree. Maybe this is a man thing - this doubting that dancing away from the crowd is a romantic thing. I agree with most thing Michael Hauge says - but not this one.

Donna MacMeans said...

PJ - Thank you. When a star reviewer says leave the scene in, I'm inclined to agree. As to real life...there's still time. You'll meet the right guy and you'll be dancing on a beach away from the crowds - and you'll remember this conversation and break out laughing! Remember - I told you so. (grin).

Jane said...

Congrats on the GR and on the new grandson, Helen.

Hey Donna,
It might be cliched, but I still think it's quite romantic. I like that the couple is in their own world when they're dancing.

Loucinda McGary aka Aunty Cindy said...

Definitely LEAVE IT IN, Donna!

I suspect Hauge might be in the 2 left feet camp with Pink's DH and that's why he doesn't think it is romantic. (SIGH) *I* happen to think it is lovely.

WTG Helen! Have a fabulous time at ARRC2011 and SUPER CONGRATS on the new grandson!

AC

hrdwrkdmom aka Dianna said...

Okay, going way back in my memory for this one.....16 years old at a prom, geeky girl, didn't know how to dance. Hero pulls her gently into the hallway outside the gym and begins to spin her in a slow circle up and down the hallway and says now look at you, you're dancing. Yeah, that was romantic with a capital R.

barb said...

He Can sit in the back of the car with me Helen....I will keep an eye on him...

I say keep it in ... how many historical books do you read and they have sneaked outside and danced

Deb Marlowe said...

I agree, he's wrong!

One of the sexiest, most intense private dance scenes I've ever read was in The Fortune Hunter by Dianne Farr. It took place at Vauxhall, I think--it's been so long! But I remember how incredibly hot the scene was--and it was all in the sexual tension.

Gannon Carr said...

Of course, dancing away from the crowd is incredibly romantic! What does Michael Hauge know?

Leave that scene in Donna! We lovers of romance will thank you for it. :-)

Christie Kelley said...

Donna, I have to agree with you. I think dancing away from everyone else is extremely romantic. And in a historical, also a little dangerous if the couple is not married.

Don't take the scene out.

TerriOsburn said...

I'm totally with you, Donna. And not just because my first (and only so far) MS has a couple dancing away from the crowd. I love those scenes! Even when there's no music, but they're still perfect in perfect harmony. *sigh*

Michael is clearly wrong on this front!

Donna MacMeans said...

Jane - Thank you. I think so too. It was truly a memory-worthy moment when the dh and I danced alone outside at that party. But we weren't alone for long - another couple came out and joined us. (I liked it better when we were alone.) Later when we went back inside and the dh had disappeared to get me a drink, some snarky lady banker said "you two should get a room." I said, "Thank you, as we've been married thirty some years now, we already have one." Her jaw dropped (grin).

So it must look as romantic as it felt.

Anna Sugden said...

As much as I adore and worship Michael Hague and his writing advice, I disagree on that point too. I can see why he might think it's cliched, but we all know the true romance of a dance and what it represents. To say nothing of the sexual tension *g*.

I'm not a fan of the 'dance to music no-one else can hear', though.

One of the many things I love about my hubby is that he's prepared to dance with me.

gamistress66 said...

it may well be cliche, but it can be oh so romantic -- keep it in. Was recently at a family wedding and there was some music playing before dinner. my sis & bil (married 30+ yrs) started dancing by the table. they weren't off by themselves (the rest of us were there as well as many of the other guests waiting on the bridal party to enter) but I still thought it was very sweet that he smiled, stood, put his hand out, she smiled & placed her hand in his, and then he helped her up into his embrace and they started dancing. still think it's sweet, a little corny too but sweet.

I say keep it in. I'm sure you'll make it wonderfully romantic.

Donna MacMeans said...

AC - I see he's presenting in NYC this year to the online womens fiction chapter of RWA. If he's doing a special presentation for them, he'll probably be doing a workshop for the general RWA membership as well. Maybe I'll get a chance to ask him to explain his comment. I see this blog reference is 2002. I wonder if his mind has changed since then?

Donna MacMeans said...

Aw Dianna - that is so lovely. That's a lifetime memory, like it was scripted from a movie...or a book. In fact, it may now appear in a book (grin).

Donna MacMeans said...

Barb - I'm trying to think of a book with a private dancing scene - and coming up blank. Most, I think, have the couple dancing with other couples as I would suspect that slipping off and dancing privately would just be too risque. This is terrible - but I can't even remember if I did this in my earlier books. I know in THE EDUCATION OF MRS. BRIMLEY that there was a scene where the hero watches his brother dance with Emma through a window and seethes with jealousy. Later she comes outside on the terrace and he confronts her - but I can't recall if they danced...or at least swayed...out there in the dark. I wrote that book too long ago.

Barbara Monajem said...

LOL. Looks like all the ladies like the dancing scenes. Nothing is hackneyed if you do it right. :)

Donna MacMeans said...

Deb -

Yeah - it's all in the sexual tension. That incredible wanting - and now the hero is so close, and you can feel his arms around you and it's private... Yeah - very sexy. I'll have to see if I have a copy of The Fortune Hunter in my stacks.

I'm afraid my scene is too early in the relationship to be extremely sexy. It's more about the sudden awareness of each other as something more than co-conspirators. I thought it worked well - especially when the couple is discovered - but then I read Hauge's comments.

Donna MacMeans said...

Yay Gannon - I'll add your vote. Leave the scene in - eleven. Michael Hauge - zero.

Trying to think of this in books as per Deb's comment, I have to admit that I think I've seen the dancing away from the crowd more in movies than books. In books, we can make the couple dancing extremely intimate even when they're surrounded by people. That's harder to do on screen when you can see all those other people. Although Gone With The Wind managed pretty well. Remember Rhett and Scarlet at the charity ball?

Donna MacMeans said...

Christie - yeah on the dangerous element - I guess that's why it's so romantic. There's a risk taken that you won't find in a contemporary. I think that's also why that scene from Witness is so romantic. There's a risk there as well. The tennis court scene in Sabrina? Well, I suppose that's was pure romance. If I remember correctly, the older brother was trying to romance Sabrina to break off the attraction for his younger brother. Yeah - dancing on the tennis court would do it.

Donna MacMeans said...

Terri - Good for you on that dancing scene! I can't remember if you said that manuscript was contemporary or historical. The dancing apart from the crowd does say that this one, this person, is special - doesn't it? So special - that I'm surprised we all don't dance away from the crowd as a matter of normal courtship (grin). Talk about lost opportunities, men. You don't know what you're missing!

TerriOsburn said...

Donna - It's contemporary. Two teachers, chaperoniong a high school semi-formal and pretending they aren't in love. So they dance where they can't be seen. And then they go home to her place and do some horizontal dancing. LOL!

I hope the sexual tension comes through or I'm in trouble!

Donna MacMeans said...

Anna - Gotta love a dancing man. Even if he has two left feet, it's special if he's willing to hold you in his arms in a public venue. I swear I fell in love with my husband on a dance floor - but that was rock and roll, not necessarily slow dancing (grin). You know - I think I have dancing in some shape or form in all of my books. I guess dancing is special to me so it finds a way into my books.

BTW, Anna, I'm currently doing the galleys for my August release and came across your name in the copy. LOL. I think I was looking for something that sounded British and figured why not go with a true Brit! (grin). Come to think of it, there's several references to banditas in that book - if you know where to look.

Donna MacMeans said...

Gamistress - what a sweet story! Actually, it's the corniess that makes it work. The husband was willing to be corny in public to show his affection for his wife. I bet that 30+ years will turn into 40 and 50+ years.

One of the movie scenes that springs to mine of married couples dancing privately is from Come Fly with Me - isn't that the movie about the true story of the counterfeitor who successfully impersonated many different professions in order to escape Tom Hanks? Anyway - there's that scene where the married couple is doing the dishes in the kitchen and they just sway together to the radio while she washes and he dries. Love it. Of course, the idea of a man doing the dishes is almost as sexy as asking one to dance away from the crowd (grin).

Donna MacMeans said...

Barbara - You're right - we do have a pretty one-sided discussion here (grin). We need some masculine opinions!

Donna MacMeans said...

Terri - That sounds great. Especially if they're dancing away from public scrutiny because they've separated couples who were dancing too intimately - here they're doing it themselves. Or if there's some sort of policy against fraternity amongst teachers - some element of risk. I can see how danicng vertically can lead to more horizontal positioning (grin).

BJ said...

Maybe poor Michael has had a bad "momment" and thus made dancing away from the crowd non-romantic.
Personally I find that I love it!
I think He just needs to give it another go around. I'm sure he'll have another outview on the subject with a better partner...LOL

hrdwrkdmom aka Dianna said...

Donna MacMeans said...
Aw Dianna - that is so lovely. That's a lifetime memory, like it was scripted from a movie...or a book. In fact, it may now appear in a book (grin).

And that would be fine too Donna, my BF keeps asking if anything from our dinner has showed up in a book yet. BG

I didn't end up with the hero of course, he was kind of every geeky girl's hero so we all had to share him. He even carried me up a set of stairs when I sprained my ankle at school.

Louisa Cornell said...

Good on you, Helen! We will expect a full report of ALL of your adventures!


Shall We Dance? from The King and I? HELLO?? Talk about romantic and sexual tension! Sheesh!

I agree with La Campbell. The man is a hat talker when it comes to the romance of a couple dancing all alone to music only they can hear or to music from another room.

jo robertson said...

Great topic, Donna!

Whooohoooo, Helen, the rooster's off to Oz. You'll have tons of fun with him if he goes to the Conference with you!

I've done that dancing-without-music with my husband too, Donna, in the privacy of our living room. Maybe it's a bit corny in films or books, but in real life, it's pretty romantic.

I agree with you! Double take that, Michael Hauge!

MsHellion said...

Yeah, Michael or whoever he is is so wrong. Wrong, wrong--WRONGO.

The dance in The Notebook--very romantic.

The dance in Hope Floats.

Dancing is always romantic. He can put a sock in it.

Donna MacMeans said...

BJ - I suspect that, as a screenwriter script doctor, his comment was more from the scripts he's read as opposed to personal experience - but I could be wrong!
Inasmuch as we all seem to love the idea of dancing away from the crowd, I'm guessing that he sees an overabundance of manuscripts with this scene. Unfortunately, he condemned all scripts with this scene rather than just the poorly written ones. Done well, the scene works.

This reminds me of another trend that ran through historical romances for a while. About five or six years ago, it seemed like every romance had an obligatory water scene. The hero/heroine would discover the other in a pond, pool, waterfall, or bathtub - usually in the first chapter. I'm not seeing those scenes as much now, but for a while it was beginning to get on my nerves. I think this must have been where Hauge was on dancing. Maybe this was a trend. But when well executed, dancing alone and water scenes definitely work.

Hmmm...maybe I should write a scene with the H/h dancing away from the crowd in a fountain (grin). Combine the best of both worlds!

Donna MacMeans said...

Dianna - That was a fun dinner - even the GR agrees. I had to give him a couple baths just to get all the sauce off his feathers! (grin).

Have you gone to a high school reunion to see whatever happened to that geeky hero? Did he grow up to be a handsome heartbreaker? Sounds like he had the romantic instincts down pat. Or did he bloom into full geekdom with his romantic tendancies restricted to Dungeons & Dragons? It's funny to see how those high school personalities matured (or sometimes didn't - hehe).

Donna MacMeans said...

Louisa - I think in the next book I'll have to write a scene where the Hero/heroine hear music from another room and want to dance - but don't for various reasons. He wants to take her in his arms, but it's considered improper and he doesn't want to jeopardize her reputation. She wonders what it would feel like to be in his arms and wishes he would sweep her into a dance. It might be fun and tension rich. Hauge would approve.

Donna MacMeans said...

Louisa - I think in the next book I'll have to write a scene where the Hero/heroine hear music from another room and want to dance - but don't for various reasons. He wants to take her in his arms, but it's considered improper and he doesn't want to jeopardize her reputation. She wonders what it would feel like to be in his arms and wishes he would sweep her into a dance. It might be fun and tension rich. Hauge would approve.

Donna MacMeans said...

MsHellion - LOL. Tell us how you really feel!

Did I tell you, I thought of you while writing my August release? You'll note references to a bucanneer and pirate - those are for you, girl! They even dance on a ship. They're in public, though. Still, it's a small group and there is a watchful matron chaperone - still I hope it's intimate.

Slush said...

Hello Dolly anyone! Plus all of the other musicals mentioned in previous posts.

Oops forgot to say Yea Helen! Keep him tucked down in that car.

Mr. Hauge obviously needs to be romanced by dance! I would venture to say that La Campbell and few of the other Banditas would be willing to give him a run for his money!

Donna MacMeans said...

Hi Slush!

I would suggest we take Michael Hauge dancing in NYC, but I'm afraid I haven't any interest in showing him the romantic side of stepping away from the crowd LOL. Not my type, I'm afraid. But perhaps we can get into a good debate at the bar.

Sheree said...

It's not the dancing away from the crowd but being able to dance well in such a situation.

During the closing credits of "Howl's Moving Castle", I hauled my boyfriend to his feet so we can dance up the aisle out of the theater. This idea fell apart when we couldn't agree on how to waltz. Well, at least it wasn't a tango.

Donna MacMeans said...

LOL Sheree on attempting to dance out of the theater. I think my husband can waltz - all I have to do is tell him to polka (grin).

I would learn to love to dance the tango, but I think my husband fears that leg kick move...just in case my aim is a little off. hahaha

Pat Cochran said...

Honey & I have enjoyed some extremely
cozy moments brought about by our
meeting in passing and dancing to the
music heard only in our heads!

Pat Cochran

Donna MacMeans said...

Oh Pat - Now that sounds a little cryptic. Where were you in these passings? Were you both hearing the same song? Did someone hum - I mean verbally, not physically (grin). Now you have to share the details.

Kimberly said...

Ack!! How can someone write such a thing!?! Those intimate moments are something (I think) every girl dreams of!! Definitely leave it in your work!! So ... romantic. And just ... *sigh* ...

catslady said...

Oh, I think he's wrong too. I think it's very romantic!! My husband doesn't like dancing much (sigh).

Donna MacMeans said...

Thanks Kimberly - The overwhelming vote seems to be leave it in - good - I hate rewrites (grin).

Donna MacMeans said...

catslady - What is it with these men? My aunt, a grand ole lady in her 80s, moans about finding an available man that likes to dance. Such an opportunity missed by men who don't dance. I say give your husband lessons at a studio for the both of you as an anniversary gift.

All this talk of dancing has me ready to put my dancing shoes on. I have to wait till after tax season, but then I think I'm going to plan a night to go out dancing. It's sort of like a celebration of spring!

hrdwrkdmom aka Dianna said...

Donna MacMeans said.... Did he grow up to be a handsome heartbreaker? Sounds like he had the romantic instincts down pat.

I have always been attracted to the geeky type and he turned out very well. You know the black frames glasses stereo typed geeks wear? Well they set his cheekbones off perfectly, wide shoulders narrow waist, of course that was the last time I saw him so heaven only knows what he looks like now.

Donna MacMeans said...

Dianna - Sounds like Clark Kent!

I went to a high school reunion recently and nobody looked how I thought they would. I'm sure they were thinking the same about me.

Pat Cochran said...

Oh, Donna, (BTW, there's a 50s/60s song
by that name and yes, we have danced to it!) 1. We're at home. 2. We don't
always have actual music, he will begin the steps and I follow. 3. Although
occasionally one of us will hum a tune.
4. Most unusual places we've danced: the
driveway and a neighborhood block party.

Pat Cochran

Donna MacMeans said...

I know that song, Pat. Well, I know the first four words - in something like a moan....Oh, Donna....Oh, Donna...
That's all I know - I think because everytime we get that far, I break up in hysterical laughter. There's also - Donna, Donna, the prima-donna Hehehe

It's not a very popular name these days, at least no new songs.

Jeanne M said...

Donna -
I totally agree with you! Whether it's a dance alone out in the garden or a quiet night stroll along the beach it's those quiet times with just the two of you that last thru them years.

After 41 years of marriage it is those quiet romantic times that help you get thru the times when the kids were little and sick and after you finally get the settled that you share a gentle hug or a when they are graduating years later that you can gaze at each other and nod and know you did a good job raising them. It when you read a book to your grandchild and they smile at you.

What is really romantic is realizing that after all those years that even though the spring in your steps when your still dancing in that garden are a little less lively that your love is still strong and weathering all the ups and downs was worth ever every moment.

Susan Sey said...

Oh, Donna, I think dancing is romantic however & whenever! My husband took me to a place called Lee's Liquor Lounge on our first date (really!) to hear a band called Trailer Trash (really!) and it was exquisitely romantic because the dance floor was full of rockabilly swing kids so he had an excuse to hold my hand even when we weren't dancing so we wouldn't get separated in the crush.

And then? Then he danced with me. On our first date. And ladies? My honey can swing.

Love. First dip. That is all.

Donna MacMeans said...

Jeanne M -

You sound like a woman who is well loved and has loved well. My husband and I were reminincing tonight over some good times in our early marriage. Not that there aren't good times in the later marriage (grin) but it's fun to remember when we had no money, no equity in anything, but a lot of love for each other, and dancing in the living room to the tunes on a CD.

Donna MacMeans said...

Susan -

Why is it that your reality is as fun and fresh as the books you write? Lee's Liquor to hear Trailer Trash? LOL. How fortunate that your guy can swing! That's a talent that will last a lifetime (and help keep you warm through those long northern winters).

Cassondra said...

Woot! Go Helen!

Yes, apparently the bird wants to go to the con!

Good going!

Cassondra said...

Donna, I know we all have our pet peeves, and things that drive us crazy because we've seen them so often. Steve doesn't dance, but dancing with someone you love--or someone who has just that perfect chemistry with you--is one of the most sensual and erotic things one can do. Why in the world would it be cliche to do this alone? If that's the case, then a scene with two people having dinner, or a scene riding in a car, or---love scenes for goodness sake!--all of those would be cliches, no matter how witty the dialogue or how tight the tension. If we eliminate everything that normal humans do with one another, what is there left to use for the setting of the story?

I'm sorry. Did Michael say that real people don't do this? (I didn't read the article--haven't had time today.) I think this is one of those pet peeves, and that's a good guess. I bet he sees it done very badly a LOT in screenplays he's reading. Any scene can be done badly, or can be done well. I don't think there's any such thing as a "given" cliche if it's done well.

What a great subject!

Cassondra said...

aka Dianna said:

kay, going way back in my memory for this one.....16 years old at a prom, geeky girl, didn't know how to dance. Hero pulls her gently into the hallway outside the gym and begins to spin her in a slow circle up and down the hallway and says now look at you, you're dancing. Yeah, that was romantic with a capital R.

OH, Dianna, that just made my heart stop when I read that. Oh, my! Was he your date?

Oh, dear...I better read through the rest of the comments to see if you told more of that story.

Donna MacMeans said...

Cassondra - I agree. I think he's seen just too many poorly written screenplays that toss in a dancing together away from the crowd believeing it adds instant romance - which it doesn't if the groundwork hasn't been laid.

I know one of Hauge pet peeves is a supposed romance where two people who have nothing in common, no connection of any sort - but who look good, are thrown together and all supposed to be in love because they're in the same movie. Perhaps he sees these kind of scripts and notes they have a lot of private dancing scenes. I think he need to step back and re-evaluate.

Cassondra said...

Hellion said:

Yeah, Michael or whoever he is is so wrong. Wrong, wrong--WRONGO.

... He can put a sock in it


Snork. I spewed wine on the monitor.

Hellion, come on. Don't be so shy. Tell us how you feel about this subject.

Snork!!!! I love it.

Donna MacMeans said...

Man - just read my last post and can see my brain must have gone to bed and left my fingers to do their thing without guidance. Sorry for all the typos.

Cassondra said...

Jeanne M said:

What is really romantic is realizing that after all those years that even though the spring in your steps when your still dancing in that garden are a little less lively that your love is still strong and weathering all the ups and downs was worth ever every moment.

Okay, I went from spewing wine and snorking over Hellion's comment, to actually blubbering over this one.

I so miss the days when I don't get to spend time in the lair with y'all. I love this place.

Cassondra said...

Susan said:

Oh, Donna, I think dancing is romantic however & whenever! My husband took me to a place called Lee's Liquor Lounge on our first date (really!) to hear a band called Trailer Trash (really!) and it was exquisitely romantic because the dance floor was full of rockabilly swing kids so he had an excuse to hold my hand even when we weren't dancing so we wouldn't get separated in the crush.

And then? Then he danced with me. On our first date. And ladies? My honey can swing.

Love. First dip. That is all.


Oh.....My...*fans self*

That is SO HOT!

A guy could be the biggest geeky nerd in the world, and if he can dance and WILL dance with you--and makes it obvious he likes dancing with you--walls come down. Let me just say that. Walls. They come down. Oh, yeah.

hrdwrkdmom aka Dianna said...

Cassondra said...

OH, Dianna, that just made my heart stop when I read that. Oh, my! Was he your date?

No, that is what made it so sweet, the guy that took me to prom disappeared about 5 minutes after we got there and I didn't see him again, he took me as a favor to a mutual friend, guess he figured his work was done. The hero was in a lot of my classes and though we spoke I didn't know him that well. I wasn't the only wallflower he rescued that night. :-)