Tuesday, June 29, 2010

Kissing Frogs

by Susan Sey

It’s 1994. I’m twenty-one years old, student teaching 9th grade English. In the four months I’ve been on the job, Tonya Harding has put out a hit on Nancy Kerrigan’s knee & Kurt Cobain’s committed suicide. It’s a pretty accurate barometer of how my pursuit of a teaching certificate is going, actually. But since my dad has recently informed me I can’t be a camp counselor forever, I feel compelled to augment my imminent English degree with an actual skill set. Hence the teaching certificate.

My cooperating teacher is napping behind a barricade of books on his desk. I am three inches shorter & twenty pounds lighter than my smallest student, a fact that has not gone unnoticed. Kids are actually singing & dancing in the aisles. I have completely lost control of my class, which is bad enough. But then something in my head snaps—what the hell am I doing spending my senior year of college in high school??—and I lose control of myself, too.

At the top of my surprisingly formidable camp counselor lungs, I bellow, “STOP!”

There is an instant of shocked silence. I find this immensely gratifying & am about to perform a hostile take over of my own class when somebody gets there first. Two beats into my hard-won silence, a girl yells, “Hammer time! Doot, doot, doot-doot…”

(It’s a song, for those of you too young to get the joke. MC Hammer? See, there were these crazy pants, too, & this little dance he did, and...okay, never mind. You'll have to trust me on this. It was a big thing.)

Anyway, the class about injures itself laughing—admittedly, her comic timing is exquisite—and there goes my brief flirtation with efficacy.

Okay. So. Not a teacher. Sorry, Dad.

And why am I telling you this story?

Because I got invited to my 20 high school reunion this week.

Because in my high school year book, I predicted that by now I'd be living on my own private island with an iguana named Issaac writing best-selling novels. (I have a husband, two kids & a house in the suburbs, in case you were wondering how that worked out for me.)

Because while my dad didn't specifically include writing romance novels in the "camp counseling is not a career" talk, I understood it came under the same heading.

Because after thirteen years of trying other things, I sat down & started writing anyway.

Because after five years of writing, I sold a book.

Because after two years of waiting, that book--Money, Honey--is finally going to hit the shelves.

In exactly one week.

Ladies (and gentlemen, I know you're out there), today I am here to testify. If yesterday's post didn't convince you (and congrats again, Suz), maybe today's will tip the balance.

Dreams aren't impossible. Only improbable. And this is coming from a woman whose toddlers used to blurt out, "Rejection letters!" every time they saw a mailbox.

Sometimes you have to kiss a lot of frogs, people. But you kiss the right one?

Worth it. Totally worth it.

So what about you? Have you ever dreamed the impossible dream? Longed for something so outlandish you didn't really allow yourself to hope for it? (I include Hugh Jackman, Christian Bale, & a tremendous singing voice on my list, so don't be shy.) Did you ever pursue it? Even a little? How did that work out for you?

66 comments:

limecello said...

Does not like frogs :P But... hm - must ponder.

limecello said...

But! In reality - congratulations, Susan - that's so awesome :D (And again to Suzanne! Seems like it's a super lucky week for the S names... maybe I should get mine changed...) :P

Um... I don't know. I kinda feel like mine's the opposite- as in I had "the dream" and accomplished what I set out to do but during/now feel like it's not what I want. So.
Of course, my other dream is to one day become a US Senator so I can go up to the top of the Rotunda. (I love giving that reason. And... I think it's an accurate way to judge a person based on their response.)

Donna MacMeans said...

Oh Limecello - You beat me out! I saw the zero comments and my heart fluttered (grin).

Well - for this accountant to write and sell a romance novel - that was an impossible dream. So yeah - I'm with you on the dreams do come true. You just have to keep at them and not give up. And you have to take a risk - sometimes that's the hard part. Just trying.

Hey Susan - I thought I was going to be a teacher too! I took the first required education class and decided this is so not for me. Hats off to those that kept at it - I switched to a major in Journalism.

Can't wait for MONEY, HONEY. One week? I'll be in line for my copy.

Kirsten said...

Yay Susan!

Kirsten said...

Oh wait, I was going to leave a real message. Sheesh, it's late and my revision fingers are getting clumsier by the second.

I am dreaming the improbable dream right now, which is getting though buckets of revisions and finishing out my time at the day job with sanity intact.

My latest improbable dream? Quitting the day job. It seemed impossible, something that would never happen. I'd fallen into corporate law sometime during law school and would never get out.

And guess what? In two days, I'm done. No more corporate law. For at least a few months, until the money runs out or I panic, no more law at all.

Now that's a real dream come truuuuu! :-)

Anna Campbell said...

Lime, congrats! Hope you had a lovely birthday yesterday. Wasn't it fun to have Suz's sold party on the same day? Great timing!

Susan, I LOVE your post! Laughed at your dad. Mine was the same. My first job out of uni was as a graduate recruit with the ANZ Bank here in Australia. I don't think a day went by in my dad's life where he wasn't sorry I gave up that job. Sadly he passed away before he saw that the dream of becoming a writer actually DID work out.

I can't wait to read Money, Honey! I feel like I've been waiting for this longer than I've been waiting for Richard Armitage to call and ask me out to dinner!!!!!

Jane said...

Hi Susan,
I can't wait to read "Money, Honey." I know we'll be celebrating the release in the lair. I do hope to attain Christian Bale or Eric Bana one day. I'm still figuring out what my impossible dream is.

Helen said...

Congrats lime I do hope you had a great birthday with him yesterday it is my Hubby's birthday today

Susan

I am soo looking forward to reading Money Honey it is on the July releases at the bookstore I order my books from so I will have it soon winging its way to Oz YAY.

The dream I have at the moment is to retire oh how I wish I could just walk out that door and not go back it gets tougher everyday to go into work. As a young girl my dream was to be married have my own house and a big family and that has panned out and I love it. Another pipe dream to get to meet Hugh Jackman oh one day.
BTW my eldest daughter is an english history high school teacher and although most days she loves it there are days that drive her mad LOL

Congrats Susan

Have Fun
Helen

Susan Sey said...

Limecello wrote: Does not like frogs :P But... hm - must ponder.

But you're so good with animals! I mean, the GR loves you! :-)

Lime also wrote: I kinda feel like mine's the opposite- as in I had "the dream" and accomplished what I set out to do but during/now feel like it's not what I want. So.

Yeah, that's a tough one. I feel a little balanced on the edge of that myself. Not that I won't love my dream once it comes true, but more that if I actually pursue this outlandish dream, and it falls through? What's my backup? What will I love and long for as much?

I don't know. I really don't. I have to hope this book gig works out, I guess.

Good luck reevaluating,though. I know that's tough.

Susan Sey said...

Donna wrote: Hey Susan - I thought I was going to be a teacher too! I took the first required education class and decided this is so not for me. Hats off to those that kept at it - I switched to a major in Journalism.

Yeah, see, so should I have. :-) Except I tried journalism once & realized that as an introvert (or at least somebody with a serious phone phobia), that wasn't going to play either.

My poor dad. Can you imagine? Here comes your kids, eyeballing college graduation completely unprepared to DO anything. It must've been a difficult time. I don't look forward to it from the parental end....

Susan Sey said...

Kirsten wrote: My latest improbable dream? Quitting the day job. It seemed impossible, something that would never happen. I'd fallen into corporate law sometime during law school and would never get out.

And guess what? In two days, I'm done.


YAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAY!

I'm so excited for you, & so proud of you! I'll never forget you coming into town for my wedding, sitting on my couch 8 months preggers studying for the bar. And now we're both looking at publishing novels in the next few weeks/months.

Life's so funny, isn't it?

Go you, with your dream! I'm so happy that you can leave the day job behind, even if it's only temporary--but hoping it's permanent! Hurray!

Susan Sey said...

Anna wrote: My first job out of uni was as a graduate recruit with the ANZ Bank here in Australia. I don't think a day went by in my dad's life where he wasn't sorry I gave up that job.

I hear that! I actually surprised the pants off my dad & moved to TX with that teaching certificate for a job that paid room, board, insurance & had me working like 85 hours a week. No time to spend even the small amount of money they were paying me. I had health insurance AND paid off my car within two years. He was over the moon.

Then I quit. Because seriously 85 hours a week? Pssshhhhht.

And I hear you on the Richard Armitage thing. But hey, it's a week for impossible dreams! Keep that phone handy. He may just call!

Susan Sey said...

Jane wrote: I do hope to attain Christian Bale or Eric Bana one day.

Oh, Jane, that's a lovely dream. But you'll have to arm wrestle me for Christian Bale. And these biceps are more like pipe cleaners than effective weapons, but when it comes to Christian Bale I am HIGHLY motivated.

You can have Eric Bana, though. I don't quite get his appeal, though I firmly respect people's right to adore him. I enjoyed him quite a lot in that Adam Sandler movie...Funny People?

Susan Sey said...

Helen wrote: The dream I have at the moment is to retire oh how I wish I could just walk out that door and not go back it gets tougher everyday to go into work.

Hey, Helen, happy birthday to your husband! Will you celebrate him tonight? Wish him happy from us!

As for quitting the old day job, heavens yes. I'm fully behind that dream. Before I quit to stay home with my kids, I used to carpool to work with my husband & I remember pulling up to my building with this growing sense of awful dread in my stomach. I'd open my car door like a good girl to get out, then lean back in, grab his arm & say, in all seriousness, "Please don't make me go in there."

I always went.

But at 7 mths preggers, the stress put me in the hospital with possible pre-term labor and I quit with gleeful abandon.

Now my day job bickers around the clock & wakes me up all night & drags me down 24/7, but I still love it. I mean THEM. my kids. :-) Most days.

Gillian Layne said...

One week! I cannot wait to read Money, Honey.

My parents were always wildly supportive of my writing. I was the one who firmly tucked it away in pursuit of a sensible "real" job. And while I've treasured my experiences as an SLP (and seriously appreciate the health insurance!), I wish I had realized earlier it didn't have to be one or the other.

Part of pursuing the dream now is encouraging my children to do the same. And they are right there supporting me as well. It's a good place to be. :)

Susan Sey said...

Okay, everybody, speaking of day jobs, I'm off for mine. (It's summer vacation--we're packed from 7 til 3.) Home this afternoon! Have fun while I'm away!

SusanMallery said...

Congratulations on your release, Susan!

Christie Kelley said...

Susan, great blog. I love impossible dreams because my dream to be a writer also came true. It's one of the things I always point out to my boys. Don't be afraid to chase your dreams...but do have a backup plan, too.

It's funny but I wanted to be a teacher, too. At the time I was getting ready for college, the baby boom was done and the "little" baby boom hadn't really started. So teaching was a dying occupation. They were closing schools and laying off teachers. I ended up in computers instead.

Can't wait to pick up Money Honey!

jo robertson said...

Hilariously clever post, Susan! I just know that MONEY HONEY is going to be a hit! Congratulations on the imminent release.

Hell, I'd kiss a squadron of frogs to get one of my manuscripts published. Wait, I think I already used that ploy to get Dr. Big to marry me.

Seriously, though, becoming a published writer is up there with the big dreams -- winning the lottery and world peace.

Joan said...

Hooray!!! Money Honey is almost here!!!!

Sniff...I still remember when our little girl Smoov stood up in SF and accepted her GH for that very book!

As to impossible dreams, I'll jump in the pool hoping to make a good living with my writing and quitting the day job. Stres??? In spades and not just mental/emotional...physically!

As to attaining publication? To me it is NOT impossible...just incredibly elusive!!!!! C'mere you little contract.... (setting out conflict, plot, amazing characters as bait)

Joan said...

Oh, another dream I've had is go room with an author signing at her first literacy signing!!

That one's coming true!

Beth said...

Yay, Susan!! I'm so excited for the release of Money, Honey!! If you all haven't done so, you should check out the excerpt on Susan's website. It'll hook ya but good ;-)

I've dreamed (dreamt?) the impossible dream. Fought the unbeatable foe. Beared the unbearable...oh. Sorry. Once a song gets stuck in my head I have a hard time dislodging it.

But it's better than having Hammer Time stuck there *ggg*

jo robertson said...

Hi, Limecello, aren't frogs just the creepiest things? Shivers. Even so, I'd kiss one of the blamed things to sell a story LOL.

Happy birthday to your husband, Helen. What've you got planned?

jo robertson said...

LOL, Susan and Donna on planning to be a teacher. The student teaching can be horrendous. Having a good mentor helps loads. I was lucky that way.

Nancy said...

And the party rolls on . . . Congratulations, Susan! I am so thrilled for you and cannot wait to hold a copy of Money, Honey in my hands and read it. I read the excerpt on your site, and it's great. I love the voice!

As for dreams, a singing voice would be fabbo. I have a good ear but cannot stay on key for more than a few bars.

I also would not at all mind having a little stone cottage in Yorkshire, somewhere near Middleham where I could see the horses on their morning and evening gallops over the dale.

Trish Milburn (Tricia Mills) said...

LOL on the "Hammer Time"! I totally got it, and thanks, now that song is stuck in my head. I was laughing all the way through your description of that classroom scene.

Something crazy I'd love to do is have a small part in a movie or TV show. That would be awesome.

Suzanne Ferrell said...

Hey Susan!

So, yes, I did hope for something so way out there....and it has come true! Yippee!! The nice thing about this business we've chosen to persue? There's continual aspirations involved. Second sale, third sale, second genre, making a big list, etc...

Yeah for us!

TerriOsburn said...

When I was a kid, music was everything. In 2nd grade, I won a contest and could choose between a giant stuffed bunny or a portable 8-track player. (YES, I'm THAT old.) I chose the 8-track player and took it everywhere I went. (Portable had an entirely different meaning back then. Just sayin'...)

Straight out of HS I spent two years on my Music & Video Business Degree. (Really, I'm not making that up.) Eventually, I landed a gig as a DJ on the radio and to this day, that is the best job I ever had. SO MUCH FUN.

Now I'm turning the music dream to the writing dream and I've never felt more confident about achieving it than I do now. Much of that is working my butt off on craft, but a lot is due to the inspiration I get over here. (I know, you've got to be tired of hearing me say this now.)

I'm glad you stuck with it, Susan, and I'm really excited to finally get to read your book. I remember when you won the GH and cheering for you. Not that I could be heard over the large group of women to my left. LOL!

Kate Carlisle said...

Yippee!! Susan, I can't wait til your book comes out next week!! This really is a dream come true!

My impossible dream is coming true tomorrow! Just like Inara, I've quit my day job. Last day is tomorrow. Whew. It seems odd to even type the words. I've worked my entire life, of couse, but I've been at this firm for 19 years. It's going to be an adjustment ... but I'm up to the challenge. :-)

I have this other impossible dream that involves Daniel Craig and a chocolate souffle ...

gigi said...

Congratulations Suzanne on the book.
I love the title.

The only dream as of late I have been having is of winning the lottery.

I am hopping over to your site to check out more on the book. Like I said I love the title it intrigues me.

Claudia Dain said...

Same dream, Susan. Same parental reaction. I waited a lot longer than you did before I decided to forget well-meaning parental advice and just go for it, but got the same sweet result: publication.

I was also a high school English teacher! That shoe was a good fit for me. I was a little bit famous for my ability to control that wild 16 year old crowd. I was also shorter and lighter than 99.9% of my students. Size is not the issue. It's the look in your eyes, the "Wherever this goes, I =will= win" look that results in them backing down. I started working on that look when I was two. ;) My parents barely made it out alive.

Claudia Dain said...
This comment has been removed by the author.
Jeanne (AKA The Duchesse) said...

Hey Lime, he's back with you!

Congrats!

Jeanne (AKA The Duchesse) said...

Susan, as always, you crack me UP! Grins.

Hda to LOL about your dad's chat. My folks actually preached the gospel of "you can do anything you want!" but when I decided I wanted to be an architect, they declared I didn't have the math skills and really girls didn't do that....(my parents were frequently from another century in this regard.)

When it came to writing a book, there were frowns and tsk-ing, but since I'm pretty sure they didn't think I WOULD do it, it wasn't discussed. Snork.

Grins. Go ahead. dare me...

Jeanne (AKA The Duchesse) said...

So, you, me and Donna had that education class thing going...I didn't get to do my internship till my Junior year. BAD IDEA. I decided homicide would be an option on a daily basis if I either taught or worked in the library.

Not. Happening.

The clean up would have been SO messy.

Jeanne (AKA The Duchesse) said...

Oh, and BTW, my classmates predicted I would be a college professor. (I have taught at colleges...)

Grins.

Susan Sey said...

Gillian Layne wrote: Part of pursuing the dream now is encouraging my children to do the same. And they are right there supporting me as well. It's a good place to be. :)

Oh,Gillian, this is so true! One of the things I cherish the most about this writing gig, even before I sold--especially before I sold, actually--was the fact that my kids were watching me do this. They were right there, watching me toss my heart at something, fail, gather myself up & toss it again.

I mentioned in my post that my toddlers used to blurt out, "Rejection letters!" every time they saw a mailbox, right? It's true. They did. Every day we would walk to the mailbox & I'd say, "let's see if mommy got any rejection letters today." Clearly I got lots.

Anyway, I've chosen to stay home with my kids & I've worried that that choice might give them the wrong idea about women's options in the world. But I love that they see me doing EVERYTHING that means a lot to me. I'm making sacrifices to do it, & so are they, but they're seeing their mom chase the dream, up close & personal.

I hope it's good for them. I really do.

Susan Sey said...

Susan Mallery wrote: Congratulations on your release, Susan!

Thanks, Susan! I'm terrified, but at the same time ready to just get it over with, too. If you need me, I'll be the one breathing into a paper bag. :-)

Susan Sey said...

Christie Kelly wrote: It's funny but I wanted to be a teacher, too. At the time I was getting ready for college, the baby boom was done and the "little" baby boom hadn't really started. So teaching was a dying occupation. They were closing schools and laying off teachers. I ended up in computers instead.

Ha! Me, too! I had to move to Texas to get my first teaching job. I stayed there three years. I always say, living in TX was the closest I've ever come to living in a foreign country. The culture there is that strong.

Susan Sey said...

Jo wrote: Hell, I'd kiss a squadron of frogs to get one of my manuscripts published. Wait, I think I already used that ploy to get Dr. Big to marry me.

Aw, Jo, Dr. Big's still thanking his lucky stars you said yes. :-)

Now just keep kissing frogs (or entering contests or querying agents, etc.) and I'll bet that publishing thing will happen, too. You've got talent in spades, bandita. Now we just have to get the stars in the right order...

Susan Sey said...

Joanie wrote: As to attaining publication? To me it is NOT impossible...just incredibly elusive!!!!! C'mere you little contract.... (setting out conflict, plot, amazing characters as bait)

Does anybody else have Wiley Coyote & the Road Runner in their head right now? Joanie sticking a flag into a pile of manuscript pages that reads "Free Birdseed?" Getting ready to drop an anvil on an editor?

I love your writing, Joanie. It'll happen. How can the world resist those gladiators of yours?

Susan Sey said...

Joanie wrote: Oh, another dream I've had is go room with an author signing at her first literacy signing!!

That one's coming true!


True enough! After Orlando, you can say you've slept with a published author! Heck, after Orlando, if we switch up enough, you can say you've slept with three published authors. In one week, you trampy little thing. :-)

Susan Sey said...

Beth wrote: I've dreamed (dreamt?) the impossible dream. Fought the unbeatable foe. Beared the unbearable...oh. Sorry. Once a song gets stuck in my head I have a hard time dislodging it.

But it's better than having Hammer Time stuck there *ggg*


Oooooh, I know. I debated against writing this post just because I knew I stick you all with Hammer Time. Sorry. Couldn't be avoided. The punch line was too good.

And thank for the plug re: my excerpt, Beth! I'm still always amazed anybody bothers to read my stuff. It's a miracle to me each & every time somebody says something about one of my books, something indicating they've actually read the thing. I'm just gobsmacked. So thanks! :-)

P.S. I'm looking at my copy of Do You Take This Cop right here on my desk at this very moment. I can't remember if I told you how much I enjoyed it but I really did. I normally don't care for kids in my romance novels but I loved the son. You did him so well & with such truth. Maybe that's it--it's tough to write true kids & you pulled it off. Anyway, thanks for a good read.

Susan Sey said...

Jo wrote: LOL, Susan and Donna on planning to be a teacher. The student teaching can be horrendous. Having a good mentor helps loads. I was lucky that way.

I can totally picture you ruling your classroom with a glorious sang froid, Jo. A sang froid I, sadly, do not possess. sigh. A good teacher is nothing to screw with. You know who else I discovered was a kick-butt teacher? Claudia Dain. And she has that same vibe of don't-screw-with-me gravitas you have. Are you born with it, or do you learn it somehow?

Susan Sey said...

Nancy wrote: As for dreams, a singing voice would be fabbo. I have a good ear but cannot stay on key for more than a few bars.

Oh, I hear that. I'm relatively on key but have been cursed with a voice about the same size I am. (Pitifully small, if you haven't met me in person.) But I have Aretha Franklin sized aspirations. It's pathetic, really.

As for that stone cottage, it sounds gorgeous. You could belt out My Fair Lady to the horses as they trot by. Wouldn't that be fun? :-)

Susan Sey said...

Trish wrote: Something crazy I'd love to do is have a small part in a movie or TV show. That would be awesome.

Ooooh, fun! Any particular show you'd be on? I think I'd pick Mad Men. I've been watching it lately & am deeply, madly in love with the wardrobe. Getting dressed up & clippetyclopping through the set would be such a blast.

Susan Sey said...

Suz wrote: So, yes, I did hope for something so way out there....and it has come true! Yippee!! The nice thing about this business we've chosen to persue? There's continual aspirations involved. Second sale, third sale, second genre, making a big list, etc...

Oh, tell me about it! But I love the way you've framed it as a "continual aspiration" rather than a terrifying opportunity for failure. :-) (It's occurred to me that I may be a glass-half-empty kinda girl. Bummer.)

But I'm totally going to adopt this attitude. It's another aspiration, another hurdle for me to make mince-meat of. I'm going to kick this next goal's ass! Watch me go! Yahoo!

(OKay, somebody please remind me of this post when I next come to you, whining about the tragic demise of my career.)

Susan Sey said...

TerriOsburn wrote: Now I'm turning the music dream to the writing dream and I've never felt more confident about achieving it than I do now. Much of that is working my butt off on craft, but a lot is due to the inspiration I get over here.

Terri, this is so great to hear. Seriously. This is exactly what we're doing here, what we're here for. We're sharing the journey, helping each other out, lifting each other up. We're all about the improbable dream, about building a community of people who are chasing it, odds be damned. We're so glad you're here, running this race with us.

And LOL on how the idea of 'portable' has evolved over the years. My favorite episodes of the X Files are the ones set a few years in the past (earlier than the show, which was, what, mid to late nineties?) when Mulder whips out a cell phone the size of a cinder block. I giggle every time. :-)

Susan Sey said...

Kate Carlisle wrote: My impossible dream is coming true tomorrow! Just like Inara, I've quit my day job.

Wahoo, Kate! I'm so happy for you, & can't wait to see how to turn this opportunity into publishing gold! I'm sure it'll be an adjustment but, speaking as somebody who feared the worst for herself when she quit her job to stay home with an infant, I'll tell you it's easier than you think to develop a new routine. Congrats!

Kate also wrote: I have this other impossible dream that involves Daniel Craig and a chocolate souffle ...

Now that's one I'd like to hear more about. :-)

Susan Sey said...

Gigi wrote: The only dream as of late I have been having is of winning the lottery.

Hey, that's a good one. :-) If you happen to hit that one, definitely let us know. I have a feeling money can facilitate a lot of other impossible dreams.

And I'm glad you like my title! Money, Honey was the original title, & I was terrified Berkley would change it on me but nope. I got to keep it. Now I just have to hope people like it enough to take a chance on a new author....

Susan Sey said...

Claudia Dain wrote, re: petite teachers vs. large student: Size is not the issue. It's the look in your eyes, the "Wherever this goes, I =will= win" look that results in them backing down. I started working on that look when I was two. ;) My parents barely made it out alive.

See, I suspected it was something like this. You either have the right attitude, or you don't. I have a feeling that I, at twenty-one, didn't quite have *it* yet. Now, I might stand a chance. Then? Pshhhht.

Susan Sey said...

Jeanne wrote: My folks actually preached the gospel of "you can do anything you want!" but when I decided I wanted to be an architect, they declared I didn't have the math skills and really girls didn't do that....(my parents were frequently from another century in this regard.)

Oh, Jeanne, that's so...familiar. My folks were kinda the same. Definitely on the "do anything you want" speech, but backing it up with "be REASONABLE, child." And while they weren't necessarily overt with the boy vs. girl jobs, I definitely understood that there were options they considered do-able vs those that were pie in the sky.

Plus I honestly didn't have the math skills. :-)

But LOL on the "dare me" thing. I'm totally that way. YOu think I can't? You think I won't? Ha! WAtch THIS!

Susan Sey said...

Jeanne also wrote: I decided homicide would be an option on a daily basis if I either taught or worked in the library.

Not. Happening.

The clean up would have been SO messy.


To quote one of my favorite writers, "SNORK." :-)

As a fellow mom, may I add AMEN to that? Consider the clean up before you embark on a plan of action, people! Think ahead!

Also to consider: snacks, water, sunscreen & the availability of bathrooms. Just sayin'.

Christine Wells said...

Beautiful, beautiful post, Susan! I'm so pleased for you. Have pre-ordered my copy and eagerly await its arrival! I know it's going to be FABULOUS!!!

And I can so see those kids doing Hammer Time. ROTFLMAO!!

Becke Davis said...

Lime, you've got the GR again? Hmmm, maybe roosters like a little lime in their coconuts . . .(And I bet you are all too young to remember that song.

Congratulations, Susan, on your upcoming release! I read Money, Honey and now I can hardly wait for Susan's next book! It's soooooo long, I'm going to go stir crazy!

Susan Sey said...

Christine wrote: Have pre-ordered my copy and eagerly await its arrival! I know it's going to be FABULOUS!!!

Thanks for the vote of confidence! I'm nearly dead with anxiety, so I'm looking forward to getting this darn debut over with. If I fail, I fail. But at least I'll be out of suspense, you know?

Christine also wrote: And I can so see those kids doing Hammer Time. ROTFLMAO!!

It WAS pretty funny. I mean, not at the time or anything, but with the benefit of time & hindsight...yeah. That girl had some true comic timing.

Susan Sey said...

Becke wrote: I read Money, Honey and now I can hardly wait for Susan's next book!

Aww, Becke, you're too kind. I'd love to see my next book hit the shelves, too, but it seems to have stalled on my editor's desk. :-( That's what I get for being a little bitty fish in the big ol' Penguin pond. Not a complaint, of course. But if I ever get ahead of myself & start growing too big for my britches, it's a nice perspective check. :-)

Beth said...

P.S. I'm looking at my copy of Do You Take This Cop right here on my desk at this very moment. I can't remember if I told you how much I enjoyed it but I really did. I normally don't care for kids in my romance novels but I loved the son. You did him so well & with such truth. Maybe that's it--it's tough to write true kids & you pulled it off. Anyway, thanks for a good read.

Thanks so much, Susan! I'm glad you enjoyed DYTTC *g*

Writing kids isn't easy, especially since it seems like it's been a hundred years since my teens were little :-)

Deb said...

"Down on the banks of the hanky-panky where the bullfrogs jump from bank to banky..." Sorry, Susan, couldn't resist. ;)

CONGRATS on the release of MONEY, HONEY!! Woot! Woot!

I thought about being a librarian once, but realized grad school wasn't for me. My sister and I were going to buy a well-established bookstore, but the owner set the price at an astronomical amount. We found out later that she didn't really want to sell, but her husband wanted her to put it on the market and if she didn't have a buyer, then so be it.

I'm happy being a teacher, but it is so different now than even 23 years ago when I first taught. It's still fun, but stressful, too.

Again, hurray on the release of MH!

Louisa Cornell said...

Lime ! How about kissing a rooster?

A whole week to wait? WAAAAAAAAAA!! I wanna read it NOW!

HUGE Congratulations, Susan!! I am thrilled to pieces for you!!

Had to laugh at your teaching story. The only reason I got a teaching degree in undergrad school was to calm my parents' fears that the music career MIGHT not work out for me. At 5' tall and 98 pounds student teaching in one of the most notorious high schools in Alabama my introduction to public school teaching was NOT conducive to thoughts of a continuing career in education. You did better than I did. I actually decked a student during my student teaching stint. I had long hair which I usually wore up. The one day I wore it down a student walked behind me and grabbed a handful in an attempt to drag me out of the room because I ordered him to the principal's office. Did you know a six foot tall full-of-himself teen-aged thug will cry like a baby if you grab his elbow and his wrist and jack them up in the wrong direction? Thank God I grew up with brothers. Kid never bothered me again. I did teach high school English and History in private schools for five years before the last year disillusioned me forever.

I did pursue one dream and see it through to a great career and great adventure.

Now I am trying to return to my very first dream and see it through to another great career and adventure.

Reading stories like yours helps to keep me going, Smoov! Thanks!

Claudia Dain said...

Susan, I got my teaching certificate in CA, where you have to do the four year degree in your major, and *then* do another two years to get the credential. CA was very big on not allowing anyone to graduate who couldn't manage the class (just imagine LA Unified for a moment here). Shudder. *g* I had a good friend who did all the work and at the last second, her last semester in the grad program, they wouldn't issue her a credential because they didn't feel she could control the class. She had to drop out. They took it that seriously. I'm going to credit them with inspiring me to learn the "stare down." *G*

Pat Cochran said...

Congratulations, Susan!

I'm here to testify that though
one doesn't always live out an
original dream, there's always
that open window! I've succeeded
in ways I never would have, in
any shape or form, imagined! I
won't take up the time or space
here, just know that I'm happy
at the way life has unexpectedly
blessed me!

I'll be on the lookout for your
book, I look forward to reading
Money Honey. On a couple of blog
sites I visit, readers mentioned
that they are reading it!

Pat Cochran

Susan Sey said...

Deb wrote: I'm happy being a teacher, but it is so different now than even 23 years ago when I first taught. It's still fun, but stressful, too.

Twenty-three years? Wow, see that totally impresses me. Especially after my experience in the classroom. I mean, I got an up close & personal look at the career & I know that there are people who do it for the paycheck & people who were born to teach. Unfortunately they both survive in the classroom.

But you can tell the ones who love it. Their kids love them right back, even though--or maybe because--those teachers are tough. Kids aren't dumb. They know who's marking time & who's engaged with them.

Congrats on being one of the good ones. My hat's off to you guys.

Susan Sey said...

Louisa wrote: Did you know a six foot tall full-of-himself teen-aged thug will cry like a baby if you grab his elbow and his wrist and jack them up in the wrong direction? Thank God I grew up with brothers. Kid never bothered me again.

You know, I suspected this was the case but never had the self-possession to find out for myself. I'm so proud of you! Power to the Short People!

Susan Sey said...

Claudia Dain wrote: I got my teaching certificate in CA, where you have to do the four year degree in your major, and *then* do another two years to get the credential. CA was very big on not allowing anyone to graduate who couldn't manage the class

I think this is SUCH an important distinction. I went to the University of Michigan which (I discovered far too late) was more focused on educational theory rather than training teachers. Many of my teachers in the school of ed had never logged more than a token amount of time in an actual classroom.

They would have set me loose on a classroom of kids with no qualms. My supervising teacher (not the guy whose classroom I student taught in but the guy who taught my classes at the U) was seriously disappointed when I chose not to pursue a classroom job upon graduation. I still can't believe that.

It took three years of 85 hour a week work with inner city 5th graders before I felt any sort of competence as a teacher. And by then I realized I didn't love the work & had to figure something else out.

Happily, I figured something else out. :-)

Susan Sey said...

Pat Cochran wrote: I'm here to testify that though
one doesn't always live out an
original dream, there's always
that open window! I've succeeded
in ways I never would have, in
any shape or form, imagined! I
won't take up the time or space
here, just know that I'm happy
at the way life has unexpectedly
blessed me!


I think the balance of happiness is being open to unexpected blessings. Very, very wise, Ms.Cochran!