Sunday, October 4, 2009

FEELINGS


Note: Sorry for today's delay, readers. We had an emergency mix-up. Pictures coming. Jomama.

Three year old Annie was whining the other day.

“What’s wrong, baby,” says her mother, seriously refraining from any eye rolling.

“Well,” Annie says, “I just have a bad feeling that someone’s going to eat me.”

“Don’t you hate that feeling,” her wise mom answers.

Streisand aside, feelings, premonitions, that ghost of a tickle at the back of your neck can fill you with foreboding and dread, or excitement and anticipation.

How many romance stories begin with that tingle, the whisper of a hot slide down the spine, the shock of a glance across a room?

The heart and soul of romance is feeling, that emotional roller-coaster ride on the way to true love.

I read a lot of mainstream suspense – Robert Parker, Michael Connelly, Robert Crais are among my favorites. But I always feel a little cheated on the romance angle, left wanting just a tad bit more of the romantic relationships, such as they are, in the story.

A male teacher in my English Department attended a conference on Jane Austen. I was eager to hear what insight he’d gotten on this amazing nineteenth century writer.

“Ack,” he said, “boring, boring, boring. If I never read another Austen novel again, it’ll be too soon.”

Case closed.

What?

I finally realized he wasn’t interested in reading or talking about relationships. He wanted to discuss “guts and glory,” men and wars and events that change the world.

Uh, don’t relationships change a whole lot of worlds?

We never saw eye to eye on Austen, but we agreed to disagree on important writers.

But I realized that romance readers often read for an entirely different purpose that other readers. We want the relationship. We talk about love and romance and sexual tension, but what we’re really aiming for is that soul connection between our hero and heroine, the indefinable something that binds them to each other.

One of the most powerful emotional scenes I’ve read is when Scarlett O’Hara falls down the stairs and Rhett Butler is emotionally brought to his knees. Wow!

What about you? What are some of your favorite emotional, love, or relationship scenes in a book or movie?

63 comments:

Virginia said...

Is he coming my way today!

Virginia said...

Well Jo, you mentioned my all time favorite the one with Rhett and Scarlett! That was one awesome book and my favorite book of all times. We all go for those deep emotions!

Jeanne (AKA The Duchesse) said...

Hey Virginia! You got the chook. :> I was aiming for him but got sidetracked coming over.

Jo, another wonderful, thoughtful post.

I always want more, more relationship, more action. Unlike your colleague, I don't find them mutally exclusive. I'm a bit like him in that I'm not a huge Austen fan.

*wince* I know, I know. Sacrilege, right? But there's just not enough action for me in Austin. Its far more emotional and cerebral. Grins.

One of the things I love about today's marketplace for books, movies and videos is that there really is something for everyone. And if it isn't here yet, its coming. Publishers - despite our complaints to the contrary - are trying to meet the needs of the reader and sell books. If we want Vamps, they give us Vamps, and tramps and pseudo-vamps and vamps for hire and vamp detectives and vamps-who-walk-in-daylight. They meet us where we want to be. Grins.

If we want zombies...well, yeah. I don't but evidently it's a new "thing."

Some people love Rhett and Scarlett, and all it entails. I happen to think she's whiney, entitled and annoying and a bad example of Southern Womanhood. Snork. Not that I've really given it any thought or anything. Hahahah!

A series I love - devour in hardcover as soon as they're out - annoys the very devil out of a friend of mine. She describes that heroine the way I just described Scarlett. We had to agree to disagree, like you and your colleague, because she loves Scarlett too. Snork.

Wow, that turned into a discourse. Sorry!

Donna MacMeans said...

LOL Jo - I was at a dinner party last night and one of the other guests asked if I'd ever considered doing a romance from a man's point of view.

I scratched my head and pointed out that I do both the man's and females point of views in my books. She said "No - a romance for men. One with a man having all those emotions that a man would read."

I'm thinking - I don't think men read romances because those novels are all about emotions and feelings and cerebral things. But that's okay. I'm not fond of watching sports unless I feel a connections to the team. My dh can watch any sport, any team, any time.

Favorite emotional scenes? For me it's the ones of self sacrifice for another - those always bring me to tears. Jude Devereaux is a master of this but it's been so long since I read her books I can't think of a specific scene. Let me ponder and I'll be back.

Loucinda McGary aka Aunty Cindy said...

Auntie crawls out of the deadline cave for just a moment...

GREAT post, JoMama! And I love, Love, LOVE little Annie's premonition! Kid's comments are THE BEST! :-)

The only emotional scene I can think of right now (and I'm so immersed in revisions I can hardly think at all) is from the movie "Rob Roy" where he is going off to fight the bad guy and probably lose his life. His wife Mary is pregnant and he tells her to name the baby after some male relative and then he says, "If it's a girl name her after my one true love, Mary."

I blubber every time I watch that scene! Of course the fact that it's being acted by Liam Neeson definitely helps. ;-)

Back to the cave,
AC

Louisa Cornell said...

Congrats, Virginia! You two have fun now and don't do anything illegal.

Great post, Jo!

Just let me finish snorking at the Darling Duchesse's comments !!

I love the scene in the latest P&P movie where he walks across the fields at dawn and tells her she has "bewitched him body and soul." GREAT scene!

There is a scene in Jennifer Ashley's The Madness of Lord Ian MacKenzie where he is sitting at her bedside as she lays dying. (Our hero has Asberger's syndrome in case you haven't read the book and emotions are something he just doesn't get.) He asks her "Is this what love feels like, Beth? I don't like it. It hurts too much." Is that not one of the most heartbreaking things ever?

Cassondra said...

Virginia, Congrats on the bird!

What are y'all doin on this dreary Sunday (It's dreary and cold here.)

LOL Jo, on the premonition. That's GREAT! (Not great that something is going to eat her of course....but a great opening to a blog.)

I admit that I fall into the camp of thinking Scarlett is a whiney spoiled brat. BUT I have not read the book...only seen the film. (Ducks flying fruit). So maybe she's better in the book.

As to relationships, yes, that is why I read. And when the relationship is not there, I don't go back to an author. It is the developing relationship which holds me in a book. The feelings. I'm a logic nazi too, but without a relationship, a book is just another series of events like any other series of events, for me. I can root for a hero or heroine, but I don't attach the way I do if there's a relationship.

Strange, isn't it, how people are so different in what they like to read and what holds them.

jo robertson said...

Hi, Virginia. Has it been a while since the rooster visited you?

It's been a while since I read GWTW, Virginia, but I think that was the scene when Scarlett was pregnant and lost the baby when she fell, wasn't it?

I just remember the painful misunderstanding between them, each wanting the other, but allowing the past to keep them apart.

jo robertson said...

LOL, Jeanne, I think Austen is an acquired taste. The modern reader does tend to want less detail and more emotional impact. That's why I enjoy YOUR books, very quick paced, but the relationship is still satisfyingly developed.

jo robertson said...

Jeanne said, "If we want Vamps, they give us Vamps, and tramps and pseudo-vamps and vamps for hire and vamp detectives and vamps-who-walk-in-daylight."

LOL at the vamps and tramps phrase. I love vampire stories, beginning the original Count Dracula and I've enjoyed the unique variations on that theme through the years in books and movies.

Didn't David Bowie play a vampire in a movie?

jo robertson said...

It's interesting about GWTW. It's Rhett I adore. I'm a sucker for a strong, somewhat tortured alpha male brought to his knees.

I think it's because Dr. Big used to be an alpha. He still thinks he is, but I'm pretty sure I've turned him into a beta -- they make the best husbands anyway, don't they?

Zombies is the latest craze? Yuk to that. I keep thinking of the original NIGHT OF THE LIVING DEAD.

jo robertson said...

Donna, I'd love to write a story from the man's romantic point of view. I know we do it to a certain extent in our romances, but I wonder how much less angst would be in it?

And yeah, who would read it?

But men do fall in love and commit themselves as whole-heartedly as women do. At least the men in my life do. Hmmm, maybe they're all accountants and schoolteachers instead of spies and Delta forces.

jo robertson said...

Well, AC, let's just hope Annie's premonition doesn't come true! Although she is quite a tasty morsel.

For sure that's a blubbery moment from Rob Roy and Liam is such a great actor IMO. When his wife died so tragically, I actually cried, so not what I usually do.

jo robertson said...

Hi, Louisa! Aren't all the fun things illegal :-D.

Louisa said, "I love the scene in the latest P&P movie where he walks across the fields at dawn and tells her she has "bewitched him body and soul." GREAT scene!"

I love that line. No one speaks like that anymore, but it's so lovely and lyrical. Uh, can't imagine the words tripping out of Dr. Big's mouth however LOL.

jo robertson said...

OMG, Louisa, tell us more about Ashley's THE MADNESS OF . . . I haven't read that one. How interesting, a hero with Asperger's.

jo robertson said...

No, Cassondra, Scarlett's not better in the book. She's still whiney and spoiled and in the end believes she can get Rhett back because she always gets what she wants.

It's the character arc that's so interesting. I wonder if Mitchell really intended it to be a romance? It's certain has an ambiguous ending.

I'm just in love with bad boy Rhett :-D.

jo robertson said...

Cassondra said, "Strange, isn't it, how people are so different in what they like to read and what holds them."

Yes! And not only that, but different books attract me at different stages in my life as well as my moods.

What about the rest of you? Do you find yourself drawn to a writer at one point and not so much at another stage?

Anna Campbell said...

Hey, Virginia, enjoy the chook!

Jo, I agree about the relationship being the thing that draws me into a book. It works for me even with non-romances. Most of the time, I honestly don't care who dunnit or whether the world gets saved! It's whether that relationship has drawn me in. When people ask me why I write romance - usually in vastly superior tones, sadly - I tell them that I love writing that arc of a relationship to give the happy ending. Romance readers know what I mean!

Anna Campbell said...

Cassondra, I haven't read GWTW either! So we can duck together. I've tried it a stack of times - admittedly when I was in high school - but haven't been able to get through the first 100 pages. Maybe it's like the guy who hates Austen!

Susan Sey said...

Hey, Jo! Great post!

My very favorite emotional scene in a movie is from Emma when Mr. Knightley finally (after some Austenesque verbal dancing around) comes right down to it & tells Emma he loves her. Maybe it's the tension between highly prescribed manners and messy honest emotion, but I love it that declaration in period language. It's just so touching to watch people struggle to make their formal language match up to what's going on inside.

Oh, big happy sigh. I'm going to watch Emma again tonight, I think. Thanks!

Cassondra said...

Anna Campbell said:

When people ask me why I write romance - usually in vastly superior tones, sadly - I tell them that I love writing that arc of a relationship to give the happy ending. Romance readers know what I mean!


That's the thing, isn't it? I have a number of friends who try to pin down what it is I like and don't like in a film. They know I don't like it when it doesn't have a happy ending, but a lot of times they can't assimilate this. They say, "Oh, she won't like Predator because people die.

NO, NO, NOOOOOOOOOOO! That's not it!

I don't like it when the people I grow to LOVE die at the end. The main characters. You can blow stuff up and have piles of dead people as long as those people are bad or I haven't been forced to connect with them by seeing them love on their dogs or something (see...petting dog = relationship)AND I don't like it when there is no character arc.

There are a surprising number of films (many of which win big awards :0/) which have the main characters absolutely flat. They never change from the beginning of the story to the end. No character arc. And I find that to be "flat" in terms of making me attach. I need to see growth and change. The truth is, I think it is more often relationships which cause growth and change in people than it is world events.

Jeanne (AKA The Duchesse) said...

Jo said: I just remember the painful misunderstanding between them, each wanting the other, but allowing the past to keep them apart.

See, this I get and it makes me weep. I feel its better done in the book and more understandable. In the movie you just want to shake them both. Grrrrr.

Cassondra, I finally read the book when I was "forced" too because my sister said I was an ignorant fool if I didn't. Can't have that. hahah! Usually I don't let her bait me into anything, but that one got me where I live, so I read GWTW. Can't say I loved it, but GMC was much more apparent in the book.

She's still a whiney soandso to me though. Ha!

I also have to agree w/ you Cassondra that it's the emotional impact that keeps me hooked. Nancy and I often tease about loving BOOM! and I know you do too. I was, however, watching the VanDamme-a-thon on Spike this weekend. I realized that as much as I used to like looking at Jean-Claude, his movies have tons of action but no heart. BOOOOORRRRRING. :>

Jeanne (AKA The Duchesse) said...

Donna Said: Favorite emotional scenes? For me it's the ones of self sacrifice for another - those always bring me to tears. Jude Devereaux is a master of this

Jude can do that. It's been scarcer in her recent stuff which is why I'm not reading it much. Some of the older stuff though could have you weeping in a moment.

Jeanne (AKA The Duchesse) said...

Jo said: That's why I enjoy YOUR books, very quick paced, but the relationship is still satisfyingly developed.


Wow. *Blush* Thanks, Jo!

Jeanne (AKA The Duchesse) said...

Jo said: For sure that's a blubbery moment from Rob Roy and Liam is such a great actor IMO. When his wife died so tragically, I actually cried, so not what I usually do.

Me too, Jo. I adore him as an actor from Rob Roy to Love Actually to Shining Through to Schindler's List. Didn't like him in Star Wars, but that wasn't really his fault. Horrible acting all around in that one. :>

Jeanne (AKA The Duchesse) said...

Jo asked: What about the rest of you? Do you find yourself drawn to a writer at one point and not so much at another stage?

Oh, my yes! There are some I used to love that I just can't/don't read now. Some that I didn't "get" that I do now that I'm older.

Jeanne (AKA The Duchesse) said...

Cassondra, you've hit on it again. I can wade through lots of gore, but don't kill off the ones you've REALLY made me like. I'll never buy another ticket to your movie.

Jo, I've often wondered the same thing about Margaret Mitchell - whether she intended GWTW to be a love story. Somehow, I don't think so. A morality tale, yes. A love story? not so much.

Still, like you, gotta love Rhett B. Slurp.

jo robertson said...

True, Anna, it's why I keep writing romance when my voice is so clearly mainstream suspense. I always want MORE in the story, whatever it is, suspense, paranormal, thriller.

It seems to me that a relationship ups the ante on everything. Like who of us would hesitate to throw ourselves in front of a bus for the person we love?

Okay, well maybe not a bus. I'm very pragmatic. But I so got what the 65 yo wife did in that true life incident where a mountain lion attacked her husband. It had the man's head in its mouth and she kept hitting the lion with a log until it released him.

Wow, what a story!

jo robertson said...

Anna, I really think there's a window of opportunity for some books. Every year I taught CATCHER IN THE RYE, I had dozens of parents tell me that was their favorite book. I didn't read it until I was way into adulthood and I remember thinking you'd have to read this as a teenager to really understand Holden.

jo robertson said...

Susan said, "Maybe it's the tension between highly prescribed manners and messy honest emotion, but I love it that declaration in period language."

That's it in a nutshell, Susan, and I love that scene. In fact EMMA has always been my favorite over P&P. Clearly I like flawed heroines LOL.

Anna Campbell said...

By the way, did anyone else think of Imelda Marcos when they saw this title?

jo robertson said...

I agree, Cassondra. It's about what connects us to the characters and what our expectations are.

Death in PREDATOR -- bring it on. But not when I want a HEA.

You would so not like Sommerset Maugham's OF HUMAN BONDAGE.

Cassondra said...

See, I don't think suspense and romance have to be mutually exclusive at all.

I understand that they are two separate genres, but I do often wonder why they are, many times, considered exclusive of one another.

ANY story benefits from the tug and attachment of relationships the reader can hook into emotionally. It just ups the stakes.

This is why I think romance is so popular, because that relationship ups the stakes no matter WHAT The actual larger-world plot is doing. And romantic suspense is so popular now, I Think, because the stakes are doubly high. External conflict and relationship stakes pack a double whammy.

Anna Campbell said...

Ha ha! Really ducking the flying fruit now - Cassondra, come and save me. But I can't stand Emma - I find Mr Knightley really creepy!

I've been talking about Catcher in the Rye over on Facebook - people say it changed their lives. I read it as an adult and it just didn't connect with me - I wondered if it might be so closely allied with American culture that maybe it's one of those stories that doesn't translate to another country. I didn't even understand the title for most of the book. He's a baseball catcher whereas I thought it might have been about a hunter!

Cassondra said...

Oh, and I think Predator ends okay.

That's not a HEA by strict definition, but it is happy for that film. If the opposite ending had happened (trying to not give spoilers here and failing I'm certain) I would have kicked the TV and never watched another Ahhhhnold film.

Cassondra said...

Anna C said:

Really ducking the flying fruit now - Cassondra, come and save me.

Oh, I would LOVE to come there and save you. It's getting WARMER There. It's getting colder here. :0(

Christine Wells said...

Hi Jo, thanks so much for stepping in today. Great blog and I love Annie's 'feeling' and her mom's response!

I think my most emotional scene in a movie is the end of An Affair to Remember, when Nicky realizes why Terri has been avoiding him (trying to avoid spoilers here!). Cary Grant is an amazing actor because he's so debonair throughout the movie and yet the pain on his face when he realizes makes me cry buckets every time. I always love that shift in a book from someone believing things are a certain way, thinking badly of the other person, only to realize that the hurtful things they did were for noble reasons. Sigh. Going to have to go and watch that movie again!

So agree with you about men's tastes, though. My dh has an enormous collection of DVDs and I'd say not even 10% of them have any kind of romantic relationship. Only a handful (the English Patient & Casablanca are the only ones that come to mind) would be classified as love stories.

jo robertson said...

Anna said, "By the way, did anyone else think of Imelda Marcos when they saw this title?"

Uh, superficial me, I thought of shoes, lots and lots of shoes.

Suzanne Welsh said...

Hey JoMama! Lovely post.

OKay...one of my favorite scenes in any romance novel...(and they can put it all of them if they want to and I won't complain!) is when the hero finally knows...really KNOWS...the heroine is the one thing that will save him from becoming a beast or lost or cold to the core...when he realizes ... MINE a rather barbarian/caveman reaction, but the one that changes his world...

Sigh

Cassondra said...

Christine said:

So agree with you about men's tastes, though. My dh has an enormous collection of DVDs and I'd say not even 10% of them have any kind of romantic relationship. Only a handful (the English Patient & Casablanca are the only ones that come to mind) would be classified as love stories.


You know, as I'm reading through these posts and have come to this one, I wonder if it's that men like to watch what they understand and feel as though they can exert some control over? (Good Gosh that's an awkward sentence but I'm too lazy to retype it.)

Relationships seem to baffle men as a rule, don't they? They act as though they never know what's going on and are fumbling about in the dark.

Maybe films about relationships are the equivalent of foreign language film to men? Needing subtitles like, "You should feel all warm and mushy here," or "Heroine is confused by hero's back and forth behavior."

Men piling onto one another to get to a ball--THAT the guys have no trouble understanding. A prize, a fight, winners and losers. End of story. Nice and simple.

Ellen Dugan said...

Hello, Just trying out my comment capability for tomorrow's guest spot.
Blessed be, Ellen Dugan

Cassondra said...

Hi Ellen!

Looking forward to your visit.

Jeanne (AKA The Duchesse) said...

Anna, I agree about Mr. Kneightly.

Cassondra, I'm with you on PRedator. It was okay. Not HEA satisfying, but okay. Of all of Ahhhhnolds, I liked True Lies best. :>

Jo, and Anna, Catcher in the Rye is totally opaque to me. Either I suck as a reader of that type of "let's be deeply analytical" reading material, or it didn't resonate with who I am or what I know. Don't think is country/cultural. I just think there's some it hits and some it doesn't.

jo robertson said...

Anna said, "I've been talking about Catcher in the Rye over on Facebook - people say it changed their lives. I read it as an adult and it just didn't connect with me - I wondered if it might be so closely allied with American culture"

Could be Anna. The catcher metaphor is really strong in the book. Holden wants to save all the little kids from the nastiness of the world (after his sister Phoebe sees the eff word written on the side of the school). Connecting the "Coming through the Rye" song image with the baseball "catcher" image, he wants to save little children he envisions playing in a field of rye.

Well, I've probably way oversimplified it, but the book certain captured an entire generation's interest here in the states.

It'd certainly benefit from a good film version, but Salinger refused to allow it.

jo robertson said...

Hi, Ellen. We look forward to your visit tomorrow!

jo robertson said...

Suz said, "when the hero finally knows...really KNOWS...the heroine is the one thing that will save him from becoming a beast or lost or cold to the core...when he realizes ... MINE a rather barbarian/caveman reaction, but the one that changes his world..."

Oooooh, Suzanne, you so channeled J.D. Robb's Roarke character. He says "mine" in Gaelic and the shivers just won't stop LOL.

Anna Campbell said...

Oh, Jeanne, that's interesting - maybe you're right, it's a love it or hate it book for most people. Actually I didn't hate it, but it was just kinda meh to me.

Jo, there was a really awful/funny video of Imedla Marcos singing Feelings to a fawning crowd when they were still in power. I think I'm showing my age ;-)

Anna Campbell said...

Ellen, we're all looking forward to your visit!

Jeanne (AKA The Duchesse) said...

I'm with you on the Roarke/Gaelic thing, Jo. Grins. Gooooood shivers!

Ellen! Hey, great to "see you" here. Looking forward to our witchy blog tommorrow.

Helen said...

Congrats Virginia enjoy your day with him

Jo this is a great post and that is why I read romance for the whole emotional coaster ride throughout the book and I know I am going to get the HEA at the end.

I too love that scene with Rhett and Scarlet and there have been so many movies and books that I have read with such emotional scences and they get me everytime I cry tears of joy and sadness through books and movies.

There are so many and I can't think of any that haven't been mentioned already but I will think some more an get back

Have Fun
Helen

Linda Henderson said...

Movies with feelings, anything based off of a Nicholas Sparks book. My youngest daughter (27) loves his books. I find the movies very depressing and I flat won't read one of the books. She keeps trying to talk me into reading one but honestly, does any of his books have a happy ending ? The movies don't seem to. I need opinions. How do the readers here feel about his books ?

Helen said...

Linda

I have never read one of his books or seen the movies I really love a book with a HEA LOL

Have Fun
Helen

jo robertson said...

LOL, Anna, I missed the Imelda Marcos allusion. Thanks for filling me in.

jo robertson said...

Hi, Helen. There's something wonderful about crying over a good scene in a book or movie. I always feel a little foolish, but it's a grand feeling.

jo robertson said...

Hi, Linda. My baby daughter loves Nicholas Sparks. I find his writing a little sentimental. By that I mean it seems as though he's deliberately trying to pull at my heart strings.

I did stand in line to get an autographed copy of his for my daughter once when he was signing locally.

I think his greatest strength is that he hooks into universally powerful emotional experiences. People seem to like that.

jo robertson said...

Forgot to say, Linda, that I find the movies worse than the books, even though I'm not all ga-ga about the books. You might try one.

Tawny said...

Oooh, Jo, what a fabulous, thought provoking post. I love it.

I really had to think about this, since the easy answer is "I love the whole book". But really, there are always elements that turn a good read into a keeper read for me. Emotional connections, any scene that elicits happy tears, and always, the resolution scene as long as I am on board that the characters really REALLY have resolved their issues and are ready for happy-ever-after.

Donna MacMeans said...

I rarely reread a book once read so I can't answer about books affecting you differently at different periods in your life. I liked GWTW. I think the book explains why Scarlett took the actions she did more clearly than the movie. She did seem whiney in the movie, but as I was drooling over Rhett Butler, I barely noticed (grins).

I liked the movies of Emma and P&P, but enjoyed Sense and Sensibility more. When Elinor must face Edward believing he'd married and another - and then he explains it was his brother that married and he's come to ask for her hand...I'm cheering and crying with Emma Thompson.

Jeanne (AKA The Duchesse) said...

I did like Sense and Sensibility. :> Lurve Emma Thompson and of course, my darling Alan Rickman....sigh.

jo robertson said...

That's a key point for many readers, Tawny, that the lovers have worked for their HEA. You really make your characters work LOL!

Thank goodness it's not so hard in real life. Or maybe it is?

jo robertson said...

Oh, Jeanne, we're soul sister, I adore Emma Thompson and P&P was one of her best roles IMO.

Alan Rickman, what a versatile actor. He plays wicked so well (Die Hard) and then the wonderful Captain Brandon whatever his last name is!

jo robertson said...

Yes, Donna, Elinor's emotion when she broke down was so genuine in S&S.

When I say rereading a book, I really mean that I've often picked up a book, gotten about 50 pages read and then put it aside. At a later time, sometimes years, it has more appeal to me and I often wonder why I hadn't liked it the first time.

I, too, rarely reread a book unless it's a classic that I have to teach. But I know that many romance readers read their favorites over and over.

Cassondra said...

Linda Henderson said:

Movies with feelings, anything based off of a Nicholas Sparks book. My youngest daughter (27) loves his books. I find the movies very depressing and I flat won't read one of the books. She keeps trying to talk me into reading one but honestly, does any of his books have a happy ending ? The movies don't seem to. I need opinions. How do the readers here feel about his books ?



I don't trust him.

I don't trust him not to make me spend 400 pages with a character and then have that character die on the last page for dramatic effect.

I don't trust him. Therefore I do not read his work.

Sorry to be so cold, but it is the truth. My emotional well-being is at stake. I don't trust him.