Monday, September 27, 2010

Miranda Neville Noodles on Names!

by Anna Campbell

It is with immense pleasure that I bring back a lair favorite, the fabulous Miranda Neville, who is here today to talk to us about her wonderful new historical romance just out from Avon THE DANGEROUS VISCOUNT.

I adored THE WILD MARQUIS, the first book in her Burgundy Club series about a series of aristocratic book collectors in Regency London. And Miranda had me at hello when she told me that this book featured a nerd as the hero. I love it when nerds discover their inner Tarzan!


Here's the blurb for THE DANGEROUS VISCOUNT:

She is determined to find a husband ... now!

Diana Fanshawe's impeccable bloodline doesn't stop society from laughing at the antics of her eccentric family. She knows the right marriage is her one chance to make her way in the world--which is precisely why she will Marry Lord Blakeney. But then she's kissed by the brilliant ansd unconventional Sebastian Iverley, and her well-laid plans tumble into disarray.

Sebastian wants absolutely nothing to do with love or marriage. He likes his books, his male friends in the Burgundy Club, and he avoids women. But when he arrives at his hated cousin Blakeney's house party, he's smitten by the tantalizing Diana.

Should the lady follow her heart and try to win Iverley's, though it seems hardened against her–or should she sacrifice love for respectability?

Sounds delicious, doesn't it? You can read an excerpt here.

By the way, I take no responsibility for the very disrespectful attitude taken to some great works of Western art in this blog. Although I must say I snorted a cup of tea all over my keyboard when Miranda sent me the illustrations for her visit!

Anyway, without more ado, HEEEEEERRRREEEEE'SSSS MIRANDA!!!!

MIRANDA: Hello, my dear Ms. Campbell and all you wonderful Banditas. I love partying with you guys because you are, quite simply the best. (Yes, I say that to all the blogs but I really really mean it this time). Thank you for letting me ramble.

HOSTESS WITH THE MOSTESS (UM, THAT WOULD BE ME!): Ramble away, my dear, especially if compliments are involved. Here, have a cabana boy. Make sure that when you lift him by the love handles, you raise your pinky. We're very refined here!

MIRANDA: The first time I read a blurb for Anna’s MY RECKLESS SURRENDER (damn good book – read it if you haven’t, or read it again) (HWTM: Why thank you, my dear!) I nearly fell off my chair. Now Anna and I do from time to time exchange emails, but on such important topics as the weather, classical music and what we are cooking for dinner. If we should mention our Works In Progress the conversation tends to include vocabulary unsuitable for a family audience on the subject of Work, Progress and lack thereof. We don’t get into details like our characters’ names. So imagine my shock when I read about Diana and Tarquin. I was just winding up a book with a heroine named Diana and about to start one with a Tarquin hero.

Coincidence or some sinister Aussie plot? I’ll let you be the judge. (Sinister Aussie going BWAHAHAHA here!)

Diana at least is a normal kind of name, but I don’t recall another Tarquin. My Tarquin has been with me a long time. He was the hero’s best friend in my first manuscript. When that book didn’t sell, I transferred Tarquin, whom I loved, over to a new series.

HWTM: Actually I've worked out I got Tarquin from Laurence Olivier's son - my mum had a lifelong crush on Sir Larry. I had thought he was an Etruscan King, Tarquinius Superbus, but it turns out TS was the last king of Rome. Oh, well, still like the name although in Australia, he'd be beaten up in the playground.

M: Have you noticed how sometimes there seems to be a trend for a certain name? Suddenly it will crop up in half a dozen books and you can bet the farm the writers didn’t get together and say “I know, let’s all name our heroine Joanna this year.” That first MS of mine had a hero named Marcus and I swear I couldn’t find a book that year without a Marcus. It must have been something in the air.

The hero of THE DANGEROUS VISCOUNT is Sebastian. Now there have been many, many great Sebastians. Off the top of my head I’m thinking of LORD OF SCOUNDRELS by Loretta Chase, Verlaine in Patricia Gaffney’s TO HAVE AND TO HOLD, St. Vincent in Lisa Kleypas’s THE DEVIL IN WINTER, the sinister Bastien in Anne Stuart’s BLACK ICE and Julia Quinn’s adorable Sebastian Gray in TEN THINGS I LOVE ABOUT YOU.

HWTM: Not to mention the wonderful Sebastian, the hero of Christine Wells's Golden Heart winning debut SCANDAL'S DAUGHTER.

M: My Sebastian is absolutely nothing like any of these. Frankly, he’s a nerd. He collects books, dresses badly and has no social graces. He wears glasses and he hates women --will have nothing to do with them. And I mean nothing.

HWTM: Yup, had me at hello!

M: But Sebastian takes one look at Diana (actually her leg, revealed as she adjusts her stirrup) and falls hard. In love for the first time, he gets a rude awakening when he learns she’s using him to attract his detestable cousin. To get revenge and make her fall for him, he gets an extreme makeover with the help of his friends Cain (from The WILD MARQUIS) and Tarquin (remember him?).

I must say my Sebastian cleaned up beautifully and though he has a few lessons to learn along the way (don’t they all?) he ends up an all round adorable hottie. Diana, who as a widow is the experienced one in this relationship, is charming, chic, light-hearted and determined to marry a duke. However she’s not as sophisticated as she thinks she is and she and Sebastian manage to get themselves into quite a muddle.

The naming of Diana is a story in itself. Originally she was named Marianne, after my eldest sister. Trouble is, she is nothing like my sister and as I wrote it started to bother me. I scribbled a list names on a yellow pad and Diana stuck. Her younger sister had been named Arabella but I decided to go with the goddess theme and changed her to Minerva. After I finished the book, I reread Jenny Crusie’s Bet Me, one of my favorite books. Good Lord. Min and Di. I’d never once thought of it. Had I been channeling Crusie? I shrugged and decided there are far worse people to channel.

HWTM: My Diana was originally Antonia but the hero was Ashcroft so we started to look like an ad for AAA Insurance. My next heroine is Antonia - another name I've always liked. Naming characters is one of the fun bits of writing.

M: I must admit there are names I’m not so fond off. Personally I have a hard time with heroes named Jeremy or Nigel. I think they are wimp names. Not that I haven’t enjoyed books with those names but I’d never choose them myself.

HWTM: I rather like Jeremy - I like J names! Julian, Justin, etc. Nigel, nah. Ian's the one I can't cope with! So Miranda, do you have a question for our Bandits and Buddies?

M: Can you think of any hero and/or heroine names that seem to come up a lot? Do you have any favorites or least favorites? And why?


Fascinating topic, Miranda! Get commenting, people. Miranda is offering not one, but TWO PRIZES, one each to a commenter! A signed copy of THE WILD MARQUIS (great read - I told you that already!) and THE DANGEROUS VISCOUNT. Good luck!

162 comments:

Louisa Cornell said...

Miranda Neville would NEVER treat classic art with anything less than the respect it deserves. SNORT !!!!

Louisa Cornell said...

ME !!!! How long has it been since he's been to my house. No Frodo! Leave the bird alone!


Okay, I had to laugh at the St. Sebastian painting and the caption about LaCampbell not torturing a hero that much. She does, however, come very, very close!

Danielle Gorman said...

Great interview. I can't wait to read this book. Right now it seems I keep seeing the name Declan. I see it everywhere in books. Also, Minerva, which you've also picked. Was this a common name? Never heard of it until about 6 months ago. Was she really an author? Hmm...I do like it. It's different, at least to me. I also agree with Anna. I like J names. Justin, Julian, Jonathan, etc. Oh, and I like Aidan and Sebastian.

Jane said...

Congrats on the GR, Louisa.

Welcome Miranda,
Congrats on the new release. I notice a lot Jakes, Jacks, Sams and Nicks in contemporary and romantic suspenses. In historicals, I often see Marcus, Isabel, Amelia and Lucien, Gabriel and Abby.

flchen1 said...

Wooo! Enjoy the GR, Louisa! Now I confess I don't see many roosters as heroes...

But back to the question at hand... I do agree, lots of Jake and Nick in contemporaries, and in historicals, Rafe...

I did find an amusing article on naming in romances...
http://www.writing-world.com/romance/names.shtml

Helen said...

Well done Louisa it is a long time since he has been to your place how will the rest of the family cope hide those keys.

Whoo Hoo Ladies love the post and the art work LOL.
I love your stories Miranda and am soo looking forward to reading this one.

This is a great question about names there are so many to choose from I not long finished Pamela Clare's Hard Evidence and the hero in that one Julian is to die for I have read lots of Sebastians and love that name a few Simon's I am reading Kendra Leigh Castle's Renagade Angel at the moment and the hero's name is Raum and the heroine's is Ember such a difference in names over the genres isn't there but I don't think there are any that I don't like because the author seems to get it right and the name always suits the hero and heroine.

Have Fun
Helen

Barbara E. said...

I enjoyed the interview, it was fun to think about character names.

Some names I have noticed a lot of are Sebastian, Harry, Alexander, Kate, Charlotte and Emma - and I like them.

The names that I don't care for much are Nigel, Percy, and Persephone.

Sheree said...

The captions are hilarious!

I have a question: isn't "Fanshawe" spelled "Featherstonehaugh" (according to Stephen Fry, anyway)? But then what American reader will say it right (except for fans of Stephen Fry and "Jeever and Wooster")?

http://www.hatsharpening.com/j&w/quotes/Pronunciation.mp3

As for names in books: Jack, Minerva (thank you, Harry Potter!), Isabel (can we blame this on Twilight?), Ian, Simon, Beatrice and Lucien.

ironss[at]gmail.com

Kirsten said...

Hi Miranda.
Great interview, I own a copy of your book The Wild Marquis and LOVE it!!

I'm reading my thrid book, of just this week, that has Luke as the hero. I don't mind the name but a change would be nice every now and then.

I also got "to know" a few Anthony's, Justin's a Nathan. Jason, 2 Simon's and Peter.

As for women, Emma, Sophie, Jane and Charlotte are really popular. With historicals there is probaly less choice if it has to fit the era.

There are names I like more then others but if the story is good and I grow to love the characters it's : What's in a name really.

Blodeuedd said...

Fun post :=D

Let's, which names are not mentioned. Elizabeth, Mary (though she is seldom a heroine)

Tristan shows up too in my books lately

Anna Campbell said...

Hey, Miss Louisa! It IS a long time since you've had his chookiness to visit. You'd better lock Frodo up!

Don't you love the St Sebastian painting? That Miranda is a cheeky wench, isn't she?

Anna Campbell said...

Danielle, you and I are on the same page of the name book. I love Aiden and Sebastian too. And all those J names are cool. In fact, I've had to deliberately start avoiding them in my books because they are just what I naturally gravitate towards.

I'm really looking forward to reading Miranda's book too. I've had it on order at the Book Depository forever!

Anna Campbell said...

Jane, they're nice names. I particularly like Lucien and Gabriel. In fact, I like the angel names like Rafael too. It's nice when a rake has an angelic name, LOL! I love naming my characters. It's one of the really fun parts of writing. Do you agree, Miranda?

Anna Campbell said...

Fedora, I think the rooster THINKS he's a romance hero! You should see him strutting his stuff with the hens!

Loved the article on naming!

Anna Campbell said...

Helen, it's interesting how the names change according to the genre. Nobody has mentioned the J.R. Ward NHAMES yet! Sometimes names can identify a whole oeuvre! Oh, I had such a crush on Julian in Hard Evidence! He's a fabulous tortured hero, isn't he?

Anna Campbell said...

Barbara, Nigel doesn't seem to be getting the thumbs up, does he? I must say, unlike Miranda, I really like Jeremy. And Anthony. And as Helen said, Simon's popular. I'll definitely do a Simon before I'm finished (hmm, that sounds a bit suggestive!).

Anna Campbell said...

Minerva is a fairly recent one, isn't it, Sheree? Someone mentioned Harry Potter!

Don't start me on English spellings versus English pronunciations. Perhaps Miranda can give us a justification. I think it's to bamboozle people not born in the sceptred isle!

Not only is there Featherstonehaugh, there's Cholmondely pronounced CHUMLEY. There's Mainwaring which I recently discovered is actually Mannering. I could go on!

Anna Campbell said...

Kirsten, I loved the Wild Marquis too. Can't wait to see what the Dangerous Viscount gets up to!

Isn't it funny how names go in cycles? I remember when Nicholas was every second hero. Actually my latest guy is Nicholas - I haven't read one for a while so I hope I can get away with it. I love the name.

Actually I'm not sure if it's the same for Miranda, but I have to have the RIGHT name for my characters or they won't talk to me. They're temperamental that way!

Anna Campbell said...

Blodeuedd, I've seen a few Tristans lately too. Actually I think the genuinely English version of that name is Tristram which isn't nearly as sexy. What's funny is that there were a LOT of Georges in the Regency yet we don't see many heroes called George! Well, there's St George, I suppose!

PinkPeony said...

Hi Miranda & Anna!

In cowboy romances there's a lot of heroes named Cade, Jake, Cale, and Holt which always makes me wonder if monosyllabic names sound more manly. ;)
Strange names for women and strange spellings bother me the most. I'm not fond of Crystal, Hortense or Honoria, or any flower child names like Moon, Rainbow or Sunflower. Miranda, I loved Jacobin and I'm looking forward to reading your other books.
Congrats on the big pollo, Louisa!

hrdwrkdmom aka Dianna said...

I have seen a lot of Rafes and Gabriels, I like both but am joining the consensus with the Nigel, just not my fav name for a hero, and like Barbara, Percy is not one of my favs either. It seems to me if the heroine is bookish she has a name starting with P, doubt I am going to get this spelling right because it is 6 in the morning and all my brain cells are still asleep but Philamone, Phillandra, and yes, Persephone seem to be cropping up with regularity.

I loved The Wicked Marquis and have been not so patiently waiting for The Dangerous Viscount.

Anna Sugden said...

Yay! Great to see you in the Lair, Miranda! *waving*

V. excited about your new book too - LOVED The Wild Marquis.

I had a similar revelation about the 3 book series I'm currently writing a proposal for - the heroes names are Joseph, Gabriel and Samuel ... which also happen to be the names of three heroes written by my very dear friend Terri Garey - totally unintentional! And, with no link especially as she writes paranormals and I write romantic suspense. Though, we both needed the biblical connection and for very different reasons!

Don't get me started on English spellings and pronunciations ... lovely hubby and I have a joke about such things - we say we think it's pronounced [insert attempted pronunciation] but it's probably pronounced Smith.

We can add Menzies [pronounced Mingies] to the list - can't leave those Scots out.

Anna Sugden said...

Forgot to say that one of the problems with being a teacher is that you learn quickly that names reflect the children! I was recently at a drinks party and chatting with several other teachers. We found out we all had the same view of certain children's names! I'll plead the fifth on which ones except to say - beware of Callums!

barb said...

Well done Louisa have a great time with GR

Your book sounds really good Miranda..... love the art work and captions.... I am just reading all about Julian in Hard Evidence and getting to like him better as I get further into the book... like everybody else I think there are a lot of James and Nicks

Minna said...

Well, Adam and David seem to be pretty common.
Least favorites? My least favorites are the kind of names that don't clearly tell you whether the person is a man or a woman.

Miranda Neville said...

Good morning!
Louisa: personally I think I improved those art works. I bet if they'd had Photoshop in Renaissance Italy all the painting would have had captions.

Miranda Neville said...

Hi Danielle: You are right about Declan. I remember reading that name in a novel by Jilly Cooper, several years ago, and I'd never heard of it. These days they are everywhere. Aidan is another good one.

I guess Minerva is a nom du jour. I don't know if it was common in the Regency - I suspect not though they were certainly interested in Roman history.

Miranda Neville said...

Jane: "I notice a lot Jakes, Jacks, Sams and Nicks in contemporary and romantic suspenses"

It seems to me syllable names are much more popular in contemporaries than they are in historicals - perhaps because the longer names seem more formal. I'm afraid it's one of the dirty little secrets of the historical business that in England, at least, men weren't called by their first names that much. Most people would have used their last name or title (and what's a Regency hero without a title though I've just written one. Ssh.)

gamistress66 said...

Congrats on the release Miranda! :) I enjoy a good jerk to hero redemption story and what a nice quirk to have the guy get the make over from blah to hunk :)

I've always been terrible at names so I generally don't notice any name trends as I have trouble keeping them straight after the books done and I've moved onto the next -- at which point I'm trying to keep the new character names all straight.

Miranda Neville said...

@fichen1 - thanks for the link. If we're going to talk about English pronunciation let's start with Rafe. Excuse me ladies, Ralph Fiennes anyone? But we tend to eschew Ralph as a hero's name - and really who can blame us - and call it Rafe and make it short for something else.

Miranda Neville said...

Hi Helen: you are always so lovely. Raum is an interesting one. Sounds like a paranormal. Anything goes when you get into the woo woo which is one of the fun things about them.

Miranda Neville said...

@Barbara. Oh oh, Percy. Not since The Scarlet Pimpernel has there been a hero named Percy. And I bet you the French would have been on to him right away if he'd been called something manly like Rourke. Percy is for villains and the man the heroine didn't marry.

Miranda Neville said...

@Sheree: You are correct that Featherstonehaugh is pronounced Fanshawe by some (I've also just heard to reduced to Festonhaw). Actually, Diana's late husband was a bit nouveau riche and Fanshawe wasn't his original name.

Hadn't thought about Minerva coming from Harry Potter. I have seen a few Hermiones and Harrys lately, but no Rons. I have a feeling Ron may be a non-hero name. Opinions?

Miranda Neville said...

@Kirsten. I'm so glad you enjoyed The Wild Marquis. As you know, Sebastian Iverley does not seem like promising hero material but I promise you he turns out really well.

Luke's a great name but three in one week, I can see getting sick of it. Hopefully you won't come across another Luke (or Lucas) for a month or two.

I've written an Anthony and with only three books I have all those great names to choose from. I wonder how writers with dozens of book under their belt manage it.

You are right about the limitations of historical names. Actually, most men in early nineteenth century England were called John, George, Edward and a handful of other common names. But we have to mix it up.

Miranda Neville said...

Blodeuedd: exactly. Look at Jane Austen's names - she never uses anything unusual. I do see Elizabeth, but hardly ever a Mary in a starring role. I love Tristan.

Miranda Neville said...

Hi Anna: you're probably asleep by now so I can say whatever I want for a few hours. Gabriel is very in these days but it happens to be one of those I don't go for. In real life my middle name is Mary Gabriel so I think of it as a girls' name (I know angels are supposed to be male though really, does it matter? Do they *do* anything?)

Yes, choosing names is enormous fun - and not always easy. Sometimes the character pops up already named and sometimes I can't find the right name until I'm quite far into the book.

Miranda Neville said...

Ok, I can see I've got to track down Hard Evidence.

Laurie said...

Most common:

Catherine (Kate),

Nicholas (Nick)

Alexandra

Alexander

Elizabeth

Nathan

Cassandra

Luke

I like names I can pronounce!

Miranda Neville said...

Re. English weird pronunciation. I think there's usually one of two reasons.
1. Laziness. Thus shortening a name like Featherstonehaugh to Fanshawe
2. Dislike of the French. After the Norman Conquest French was the language of the English upper classes for centuries and numerous English place names and titles are of French origin. But at some point (and I don't know if was the Napoleonic Wars or earlier) our froggy neighbors became persona non grata and we made a point of pronouncing their language incorrectly. Thus Beaulieu is pronounced Bewlee and Beauchamp is Beecham.

Oh I just thought of a third reason: confusing foreigners. Bwahahaha

Miranda Neville said...

Phew. I don't have a Nicolas lined up so it's not going to go on being weird with Anna and I using the same name. Easily could be because I love the name Nicholas. I like the English Tristram myself - Tristan makes me think of Wagner.

Re. George. When I finished the first draft of THE DANGEROUS VISCOUNT and started revisions I discovered all my minor male characters were called George - you know, footmen, heroine's girlfriend's husband, that kind of person.

Miranda Neville said...

@PinkPeony
I have heard the theory that names with hard syllables are more manly and that certainly fits with those cowboy names. (But where's Ron?)

One of the things I consider is how a character got his/her name and that means thinking about the parents. So those hippy names you mention are OK in themselves (tho not for historicals ) but you'd have to give the character the right background - or explain why her mom wanted to call her Moon.

I'm glad you liked Jacobin. I can honestly say that's a name I've never seen in another romance.

Miranda Neville said...

@Dianna (great name!) Thanks! I hope you like The Dangerous Viscount. My heroine in The Wild Marquis, Juliana, was definitely bookish but I know what you mean about those long P names - all of Greek origin and difficult to pronounce. Of course, applying the laziness rule of English speech, Philomena, Phillandra and Persephone would become Feena, Fan and Penny. Easy.

Miranda Neville said...

Hi Anna S! Haven't spoken to you since Orlando Airport. Yes, I did finish the book and no, I haven't written a single word today.

Too funny about you and Terri G. Your minds must be communicating in the ether. LOL on Mingies - that's a good one and I have no explanation for the eccentricities of the Scots. Perhaps someone else can come up with one.

OK, I'll avoid Callum - or keep it for a hero who needs some serious reformation.

Jenny Brown said...

I always find it odd to see authors giving Gaelic Irish names like Aiden or Declan to people who are supposed to be Regency era English lords--people who would have been born during the Irish rebellion of the late 1700s. That's about as likely as finding a WASP New York banker today naming his child Abdullah.

But I love the sound of the name Mary Gabriel. Some people don't know how lucky they are.

The sudden popularity of hero names seem to be beyond our control. I named the hero of Lord Lightning "Edward" years ago because, when he showed up, that was his name. At the time it sounded stodgy to me so I used his title to refer to him instead of his given name. Since then Stephanie Meyer made Edward sexy again so my editor made me change the way I referred to my hero back to Edward.

I've had the good fortune to have already read The Dangerous Viscount and will say Miranda did justice to her Sebastian. That really is his name, too.

Miranda Neville said...

Hi Barb: I had Too Much Fun playing with Photoshop for this post. That would get to be a serious time waster. Perhaps I'll apply for a job at Ihazcheeseburger.com

Miranda Neville said...

Minna: Good point about those unisex names. And sometimes there's a trans-Atlantic switch. You don't get many male Leslies (or Lesleys) in the US but it's quite common in England. (Although I can't think of a hero called Leslie). I still have a hard time with female characters named Jamie (or worse still James).

Adam is one of my favorite names.

Miranda Neville said...

Hi Gamistress: I remember names better than book titles. I have a hard time recalling the title of a book I read last week but I can remember the characters.

jo robertson said...

Welcome back to the Lair, Miranda and thanks for bringing her, Anna! I love your delightful, spew-worthy banter prompted by the piccies.

I detest the name Sam. I'll never use it b/c when I was in grade school a creepy bully named -- you guessed it, Sam -- taunted me all the way home from school, saying he'd beat up my little brother if I didn't kiss him. Still gives me shivers.

Miranda Neville said...

Laurie: good point on Alex... (male or female versions). They are very popular. Not so much Alec which is the Scottish shortened version.

I agree about names you can pronounce. That's the kind of thing that can trip a writer up when she falls in love with an unusual name.

Miranda Neville said...

Hi Jenny: I loved your Edward and never once thought of Twilight (probably because I haven't either read it nor seen the movie though I know all about shiny vampires).

And you are so right about the lack of control. Might as well go for the name we want and not worry that six books just came out with the same name. By the time your book comes out it'll be something else.

Miranda Neville said...

Jo: you bring up a very good point, which is our personal associations with names. Can anyone say Old Boyfriends? There are a number of names on my proscribed list for that reason.

MsHellion said...

Romance names I like that seem to make the rounds: Gabriel, Tristan, Sebastian, Jake, Harry...

I'm not fond of the name Mike or Michael, not because it's a "wimpy" name, but because I've dated too many Mikes and they all went badly. *LOL*

I avoid books with the name Bryan/Brian as the hero. I went on a date with a Brian once and he was so damned annoying that I literally cannot read a book without picturing this guy and thinking, "I cannot believe in a HEA because the heroine will ice pick him." I can't think of a celebrity off hand named Brian to counteract this. It's annoying.

Anna Sugden said...

LOL Miranda - love your explanation for our pronunciation being all about pissing off the French! Excellent!

Glad the nagging worked! ;)

Susanna Fraser said...

I have to admit I named my Sergeant's Lady heroine's evil first husband Sebastian because it's such a common hero name, and when she first met him, he seemed heroic--all tall and blond and handsome and dashing in his cavalry uniform. The hero and heroine are Will and Anna, and my April book features James and Lucy. I kind of like the short and simple names, though I suppose I'll eventually have to drift into more exotic choices just to avoid repeats.

peggy said...

Hi Miranda,the name I see the most is Isabella and Nick

Janga said...

Hi, Miranda! I've loved hero makeover stories since I met Heyer's Philip Jettan decades ago. I'm really looking forward to The Dangerous Viscount.


About those angels . . . Milton thought they "did it." When Adam asks Raphael about angelic sex, Raphael blushes "Celestial rosy red" and says whatever humans enjoy "we enjoy / In eminence, and obstacle find none / Of membrane, joint or limb." I think that means angel sex is even better than human sex. If my students forgot everything else I said about Paradise Lost, they remembered that sentence. :)

As for names, my characters tell me their names. I'm sure we will all be traumatized if an agent or editor ever insists on a name change.

Minna said...

My least favorite name must be Jarl, not that I would have seen that name very often, but there was this book where a Finnish character was named Jarl Hendricks and that is about as un-Finnish name as you can get. It's not like we wouldn't have our share of foreign names here, but if a character is otherwise as Finnish as they can get, Jarl certainly wouldn't be my first choice. Needless to say, the name bothered me so much (among a couple of other things), that I couldn't really enjoy the book.

TerriOsburn said...

One of the best parts about reading this blog is I could actually hear your voices in my head. LOL! Lovely accents!

I'm too late to catch up on all the comments, so I'm sure someone has mentioned the name Lucius or Lucien. These became very popular and every hero was Luc.

I'm a fan of powerful names for historical heroes, but then a Henry will come along and win me over. Which is not that difficult since I am a Beta lover.

Congrats on the new release, Miranda! (And don't forget your eye patch for Thursday. *g*)

Miranda Neville said...

Hey MsHellion. Personally I can't see the name Brian without thinking of Monty Python. Looking forward to seeing you Thursday to discuss virgins.

Miranda Neville said...

I figured Anna Sugden would appreciate the piss-off-the-French motivation. It's the English national pastime (and of course the French like to do it right back)

Miranda Neville said...

Susanna: I certainly appreciate the urge to take a "heroic" type and make him a villain. My Sebastian, on the face of it, is completely unheroic. In fact, when he first drifted onto the page, annoying the hell out of the heroine of The Wild Marquis, I had no notion of redeeming him. But it seemed like such a fun challenge.

Miranda Neville said...

Hi Peggy: I love Isabella. And it's an excellent Regency name, too. Jane Austen and Keats!

Miranda Neville said...

Powder and Patch was the first Heyer I ever read. It makes me want to write Georgian just to get guys into high-heeled red shoes.

Thanks for the learned disquisition on angel sex. I went to Catholic school for 12 years and the nuns never mentioned it.

Miranda Neville said...

Minna: I am immediately adding Jarl to my forbidden list.

Miranda Neville said...

TerriO
Now why is Henry not an alpha name? Henry VIII after all was surely an alpha (though not a hero unless you believe that TV show).
I have a very smart new eyepatch made for me by Weston. Only the best for you pirates.

Jeanne (AKA The Duchesse) said...

Hey gals! Miranda, welcome back to the Lair! *waves madly* SO lovely to have you here again.

Louisa, you better watch out for that bird. Frodo has his eye on feathered frickasee...

Jeanne (AKA The Duchesse) said...

Louisa, I was snorking too about the St. Sebastian one and Anna not torturing heroes...good one, Miranda!

As to names that crop up so much...Caine. Lucien or Lucas. (Sounds so devilish, I think)

Otherwise, I can't think of any right now. :>

Jeanne (AKA The Duchesse) said...

Sherree said: I have a question: isn't "Fanshawe" spelled "Featherstonehaugh"

Well now. THAT's quite a difference. I'll look forward to finding the answer to this as I scroll down...

Jeanne (AKA The Duchesse) said...

Anna said: Not only is there Featherstonehaugh, there's Cholmondely pronounced CHUMLEY. There's Mainwaring which I recently discovered is actually Mannering. I could go on!

There's also Leceistershire which is pronounced Lester-shure, or Talliaferro which is pronounced Tolliver.

Go figure.

Jeanne (AKA The Duchesse) said...

Miranda said: Jo: you bring up a very good point, which is our personal associations with names. Can anyone say Old Boyfriends? There are a number of names on my proscribed list for that reason.

So Anna, is this why you dislike Ian?

Grins.

I like to kill off old boyfriends (metaphorically, people!) so their names tend to appear in either the villain or victim as something akin to the actual name of the old boyfriend.

*rubs hands together, twists imaginary mustache* Bwah-ha-ha-ha!

Jeanne (AKA The Duchesse) said...

Miranda said of place names: Oh I just thought of a third reason: confusing foreigners. Bwahahaha

Best. Reason. Evah.

Grins.

Jeanne (AKA The Duchesse) said...

Janga said:
About those angels . . . Milton thought they "did it." When Adam asks Raphael about angelic sex, Raphael blushes "Celestial rosy red" and says whatever humans enjoy "we enjoy / In eminence, and obstacle find none / Of membrane, joint or limb." I think that means angel sex is even better than human sex. If my students forgot everything else I said about Paradise Lost, they remembered that sentence. :)


Grins. Good old Milty. :>

Nancy said...

Miranda, welcome back! I love the way you used the art here. But I actually do think Anna Campbell could torture a hero that much. I've always pictured Nigel Havers as Lord Peter Wimsey, but apparently no one with a checkbook and connections does.

The book sounds fabulous. I love heroes who're into books, and I always enjoy eccentric characters.

As for names, I do like Sebastian, and there do seem to be a lot of them. I also like Gideon and Gabriel, which aren't as common. I was never much on Francis until I read Dorothy Dunnett's Lymond saga.

Jack seems very popular. I have a Jack I hope will make it into print one day. I also have a heroine named Miranda. :-)

I notice hero names more than heroine names for some reason. There do seem to be a fair number of Eves, though, and Victoria crops up in some form fairly often.

Miranda Neville said...

Hello Jeanne
Always a pleasure to visit the Banditas. I've never actually killed an old boyfriend but those arrows are giving me a few ideas....

Miranda Neville said...

Nancy
I want to read about your Miranda. Best heroine name evah (but I suppose I shouldn't use it myself)

I adore Lymond but I never think of him as Francis. Did you read the Niccolo books too and get the link between the two series that is revealed at the end?

Karyn Gerrard said...

HI Ladies!

Two of my favorite reads has been MRS and TDV, you both outdid yourselves!

Kind of tired of George, and Annabelle for the ladies.

All the best for your release, The Dangerous Viscount was astounding!! Now I just have to read your first release!

Cheers~

Miranda Neville said...

Karyn: thank you so much for your lovely review of The Dangerous Viscount. You really understood where I was going with the book :)

Anna Campbell said...

Aha! I'm awake. I noticed some comments from Miss Neville that definitely had a while the cat's away, the mice will play air.

Well...

MIAOW!!!!!!!

Anna Campbell said...

Oh, Jen, now you've done it. The chook is now insisting that we address him only as Your Big Polloness! You know you've got to be careful what you say about him!

I loved Jacobin too! I don't mind unusual names if they're suitable for the setting. I really liked Roma for Erith's daughter in Tempt the Devil. It was unusual but fitted the fascination with all things Italian that was a Regency fashion.

Miranda Neville said...

Y'know I got so busy this morning responding to all the great comments, I never got around to answering a couple of Anna's point in the blog.

First of all, I am so glad she added Chrstine Wells's Sebastian to this list. He was totally great. Damn it, it is an awesome hero name.

Secondly, I'm glad Anna went for Tarquin to honor her mother's Olivier crush because, frankly, I don't think My Reckless Surrender would have packed quite the same punch if the hero had been named Larry.

Thirdly, I love Antonia too. But I promise not to use it for at least two years.

Sheree said...

Oh, and the "V" names for women: Vanessa, Victoria, Violet, and Veronica.

I don't think "Ron" will make a good hero name because everyone will think "Ronald McDonald", unless, of course, the hero's day job is a clown.

As for pronunciations, some places in New England go by the British pronunciations, too. For example, "Worcester" is pronounced "Wooster" (or more properly "Woostuh" since it's in MA).

Keira Soleore said...

Bar Har Har! What a fun blog complete with pictures and clever wit.

Welcome, Miranda, and congratulations on the release of your newest book tomorrow. As you know, I was dying to read it in July and I'm dying to read it now!

"What's in a name? that which we call a rose / By any other name would smell as sweet;" Shakespeare had it right imo. In the hands of a talented writer, any name could be made heroic or villain-ish.

Honestly, I could not ever have conceived of a Tarquin as heroic. But after reading Fo's MRS, you bet it's a hawt and tender name for me.

Fo wrote, "Make sure that when you lift him by the love handles, you raise your pinky. We're very refined here!"

I love you, Fo.

(BTW, she wouldn't want Tarquin without his sword. Jus' sayin'...)

(Also trying valiantly to resist commenting on the title "Hostess with the Mostess".)

Keira Soleore said...

Also heh heh on the alliteration: Neville Noodles on Names.

Anna Campbell said...

OK, back again. I've been nose down getting the revisions done on a book due last night and I've got visitors turning up this morning and as you can imagine, the place is a tip. So I'm calling in in between housework.

Not that you guys look like you missed me! Seems to be a party going on here, guys!

Anna Campbell said...

Hey, Dianna, isn't the Wicked Marquis the best? I just loved it! And I loved the way Miranda included all that interesting detail about the Regency book trade. Love to learn along with my enjoyment.

Percy doesn't seem to be the name du jour. Must say I love the Old Scarly Pimp! Hmm, sounds like a repitilian purveyor of naughty women!

Anna Campbell said...

Actually, VA, I think Scottish spellings are part of their ongoing war against the Sassenach! ;-) Kirkcudbright, for goodness sake? Kukoobry!

P.G. Wodehouse had a great joke character called Psmith which made fun of English spellings. I love PGW.

Annie West, who as you know is my crit partner, and I love the same names too. She's had an Antonia, I've just handed in an Antonia. I have a Charis, she has a Carys. You can go through the list. Seems to be the girls rather than the boys, but then I haven't written a lot of sheikh books. Rafiq the Regency Rake? Maybe not!

Anna Campbell said...

Actually, Anna, now you mention Callum - YOU'RE RIGHT!!!! ;-)

Anna Campbell said...

Barb, my latest guy is a Nicholas but nobody would DARE to call him Nick. Snork! Oh, you'll love Julian! I thought he was an amazing hero!

Anna Campbell said...

Actually, Minna, I really like Adam. Think it's a good strong heroic name. Will definitely do a hero called Adam before I'm done.

Anna Campbell said...

Miranda, you crack me up. I'm imagining the Sistine Chapel with your style of captions. The mind boggles!

Anna Campbell said...

Miranda, I love the title/Christian name thing in Regency England. My guys almost always try and push the heroines to call them by their Christian names because it's a sign of increasing intimacy. And we KNOW my heroes love their intimacy - when they're not being stuck with slings and arrows a la poor old Seb!

Anna Campbell said...

Gamistress, I remember when the fashion was Nicks a few years ago that I did get my Nicks mixed up. Perhaps one of them should have been called Stevie Nicks? Or perhaps I should stop that joke in the Nick of time!

Anna Campbell said...

Miranda, I often save food for Ron. You know, Later Ron? Snork! Sorry. Clearly the housework is sending me Gaga. Speaking of which, not a lot of romance heroines called Gaga, although she does have a title!

Miranda Neville said...

Keira: Tarquin's sword! You are a very naughty girl.

Donna MacMeans said...

Hey - great rooster nabbing, Louisa!

It doesn't seem to matter what I name my hero/heroines - they chuck my chosen names and grab new ones about chapter three or four. Funny how the name has to fit the character - and if it doesn't, they let you know.

Miranda Neville said...

That's the Marchioness of Gaga to you!

Anna Campbell said...

Personally, like Luke and Lucas!

Miranda Neville said...

Hi Donna: amazing the way these creatures of our imagination get out of control and want to do their own thing. Like we all had any say in our names! When I told my parents I wanted to be named Bernadette, they ignored me. (I'm kind of glad they did, actually)

Anna Campbell said...

Miranda, you're right about the name game. Sometimes they come on the scene shouting their name. I'm about to do a Duncan - he was Duncan from the beginning! Sometimes I try a few names on for size and eventually settle on the right one. I KNOW in my bones when it's the right one!

Gabriel is a lovely middle name. Mine is Joan which isn't at all romantic!

Anna Campbell said...

Laurie, it was interesting - a number of people contacted me about how to pronounce Charis, the heroine of Captive of Sin. It's Karis (short A). A few people thought it might have been Shahris which is actually quite pretty!

Anna Campbell said...

Actually while you're on the beau names - what about Beauvoir for Beaver! Bet that one gets some snickers these days! They'll probably go back to Bow-vwa!

Anna Campbell said...

For some reason, Miranda, John seems to be my name of choice for minor characters! At last it's correct for the period!

Still snickering about both of us going for Tarquin. Hey, you're not doing a Duncan next, are you?

Anna Campbell said...

Miranda, still snickering. For some reason, Feena, Fan and Penny made me think of Flopsy, Mopsy, Dropsy and Cottontail or whatever that third rabbit was called!

Anna Campbell said...

Actually Mingies has become pronounced as spelled here. We have a famous former prime minister called Menzies!

Miranda Neville said...

Ooh, Anna, I like Duncan. I assume he's a Scot. And I love Charis. She's the slightly drippy younger sister in Heyer's Frederica but I always liked the name so I'm glad you rehabilitated it and gave her some backbone.

The book I'm starting now, the hero has a title but not yet a first name. So everything people have said today is percolating in my subconscious.

Anna Campbell said...

Jenny, how interesting that you were ahead of the tide of fashion with Edward! My second hero was Titus when he turned up but I let people talk me out of using it and putting in Matthew instead. I like Matthew but I've gotta say that guy's name is TITUS!!!!

Jealous of you reading TDV ahead of time!

Anna Campbell said...

Miranda, you'd be brilliant at the LOL Cats site!!! Although I want more books from you, so maybe you should avoid it!

Anna Campbell said...

Actually, Miranda, my dad's name was Leslie. It's a male name here too. Lesley is the girl's form. If I'd known ahead of time that Leslie was a girl's name in the States, I might have considered it as part of my nom de plume. Which the English pronounce Jones.

Anna Campbell said...

Actually I'm better on names than titles too. Especially as when there's a fashion in titles, there are a million of them. Scandal was in style just recently. Can't remember how many books I read with 'Scandal' in the title. Devil was the word du jour (pronounced Beaver) a few years ago.

Anna Campbell said...

Jo, how interesting about Sam! An awful boy called Colin stuck a pencil in my ear when I was in grade one. Might do a villain called Colin!

Anna Campbell said...

I love both Alex and Alec. In fact, I'm seriously thinking of writing a heroine called Alexandra at some stage. Think that's a lovely name!

Miranda Neville said...

ROFL

sheila said...
This comment has been removed by the author.
sheila said...

I love the name Alex, sounds so manly and Highlandish. Can't wait to read about the hot Viscount on the hot blue sheets, or drapes.

Christine Wells said...

Miranda, how lovely to see you back in the lair. We adore having you here! Anna, as usual, you've brought us a highly entertaining interview. Snorked at the captions. Love that photo of you both!

Hmm, what's in a name? I can't write a character if I can't find a name that fits. It's so much a part of who they are. When I'm reading and I come across a hero who has a really wimpy name I have to overcome that to like the hero. It's sort of like a moustache on a hero. I mentally shave it off. *G*

Funnily enough, Miranda was the name of the first heroine I ever wrote. I love that name and would have named my daughter that if I'd had one.

Anna, thanks for the mention of my Sebastian--as you know, I hadn't read Loretta Chase's Lord of Scoundrels when I chose that name or I would have been intimidated!

Can't wait to read THE DANGEROUS VISCOUNT, Miranda. It's a fantastic series and as Anna says, I love to see a nerd discover his inner hero! The male makeover sounds like a lot of fun!

Oh, yay, Louisa got the rooster today!

Jennifer Parris said...

Loved the interview! I can't wait to read the Dangerous Viscount. I used to love the alpha male but as I grow older the nerd turned hottie works just as well.
I like the Jakes and Jacks a lot for heroes, something simple works for the manly man type. But for the nerd you have a lot more possibilities that work and are fun.
For the heroines, I tend to like the flowery or exotic names, ones that I wanted when I was growing up. Belinda, Marissa, Kara, Jade, and such.

Miranda Neville said...

Hi Sheila. If this book sells I'm buying myself a set of royal blue satin sheets!

Miranda Neville said...

Hi Christine. Always a pleasure to (virtually) see you. Yay for Mirandas and Sebastians.

You crack me up, shaving off moustaches. I'm not a big fan either. Especially if he's called Nigel (although I'm not sure the average Nigel has the hormones to grow a moustache heh heh)

Miranda Neville said...

Hi Jennifer. Thanks for stopping by. I actually think my Sebastian *is* an alpha in his eccentric way. He may be a nerd but he's no pushover. And he certainly needs his attitude to women adjusted.

I liked your girls' names suggestions. Jade is so pretty but doesn't work in a Regency, alas.

Anna Campbell said...

Helly, the whole ex boyfriend thing really does influence your picture of a hero, doesn't it? Laughing at your Brian troubles!

Laurie Faelan said...

LOL. Great post and love the pictures! I had to crack up at the torture picture in regards to Anna's heroes. She does indeed!

Justin, Jack, and forms of Nicholas seems to be popular historical heroes's names but that doesn't bother me because I like them. Kate and Emma for heroines.

I think THE DANGEROUS VISCOUNT sounds like a fun read. I love an author that takes a nerdy hero and makes him hot!

Anna Campbell said...

Susanna, love the names you picked. And very a propos for the period! Love the idea of playing against type for Sebastian! Very clever!

Anna Campbell said...

Peggy, I really like Isabella. I think that might be in my future too.

Anna Campbell said...

Wow, Janga! Quoting Milton! You definitely raised the tone of this discussion. Isn't that cool? I remember really struggling with Paradise Lost when I did 17th century lit - interesting connection with Nancy's post about To His Coy Mistress. I loved Andrew Marvell! And who knew angels did the deed? We live and learn!

Anna Campbell said...

Minna, I think Jarl is Anglo-Saxon. It's a title, equivalent to an Earl (in fact, I think that's where the word 'Earl' comes from, although I could be wrong). That's why it's Earl and Countess not Count and Countess in England.

Anna Campbell said...

Terri, I always hear Miranda's accent in her writing. It's a lovely touch when I'm reading her historicals! Hmm, and to think mine comes out as well! I'll be definitely talking pirate when Miranda visits on Thursday. I'm a Luc, Lucien, Lucian, Lucas fan too!

Anna Campbell said...

Miranda, I love the clothes of the 18th century. I love that the heroes were dressed like peacocks but they all went armed so basically they were beautiful and lethal. Lovely combo in a hero! Perhaps not in a postman or a plumber ;-)

Anna Campbell said...

Jeanne, Frodo sounds like feathered fricassee is just his dish of choice! In fact, I think it's a naughty dog and a naughty bird in one place - a recipe for disaster (and fricassee!). Don't we have fun when Miranda visits?

Anna Campbell said...

Those crazy Brits! Clearly they've been raiding the mead cellar again, Jeanne!

Anna Campbell said...

Hmm, taking the fifth on Ian ;-) On the other hand, I nearly always had luck of various sorts with men called Mark, yet for some reason I can't imagine calling a hero that. It's interesting, isn't it? Well, I think it's interesting! Snork!

Anna Campbell said...

Ooh, Nancy, Nigel H as Wimsey. I hadn't thought of it, but you're so right. And Nigel H is actually ageing pretty well too and would look the part now. He was a bit pretty when he was younger and in Chariots of Fire and all those BBC adaptations.

Yeah, I love Francis because of Dorothy D - couldn't name a hero that, the shoes are too big to fill!

Anna Campbell said...

By the way, Nancy, I think you're right about my penchant for torturing heroes. Poor Gid! My current guy, Nicholas, gets off fairly scot free in terms of Campbellandia! Maybe I'm mellowing in my old age.

Anna Campbell said...

Actually, Miranda, I don't think the Niccolo books (for all their virtues) come near the Lymond books. But then very little does, I suppose! The link was fascinating!

Anna Campbell said...

Karyn, I saw your brilliant review of the Dangerous Viscount. If anyone wants a wonderful teaser for Miranda's book, check this out: http://karynsromanorum.blogspot.com/2010/09/book-review-dangerous-viscount-by.html

And don't forget if you click on the cover, it takes you right to the Viscount's Amazon page.

Anna Campbell said...

By the way, Karyn, thank you so much for that brilliant review of MY RECKLESS SURRENDER. I'm stoked!!!!

Miranda Neville said...

I totally agree on the Niccolo books not having a patch on Lymond.

By the way, when I read them, everyone's characters speak with impeccable English accents.

Anna Campbell said...

Snort to Larry as the hero of MY RECKLESS SURRENDER. Doesn't quite cut the mustard, does it? Although I must say I like Laurence as a name. Not sure whether I'd call a hero that, though. Yeah, Christine's Sebastian rocks!

Anna Campbell said...

Sheree, I like the V names too. It's odd how some letters seem more heroic than others, isn't it?

Miranda Neville said...

Hi Laurie. I don't know how Anna can put her heroes through such horrors. She seems such a nice person but still waters run deep. And now she claims she'd reforming... We'll see about that.

Kate and Emma are both wonderful names and suitable for all time periods, too.

Anna Campbell said...

Hey, Keira, home from your wild travels in the Old Dart. Would have loved to be there with you - man, you packed in the sightseeing! So glad you had a brilliant time.

Ha ha, I love that you laugh at my AWFUL jokes! It's a true act of friendship.

And yeah, a Tarquin without his sword is just a Tarwimp, really, isn't he?

We always have such fun when Miranda visits the lair, don't we?

Jeanne (AKA The Duchesse) said...

Anna said: Percy doesn't seem to be the name du jour. Must say I love the Old Scarly Pimp! Hmm, sounds like a repitilian purveyor of naughty women!

SPEWAGE!! OMGosh. Lost it on that one. Hahahah!

Anna Campbell said...

Actually, it was nearly Neville Noodles on Noodles but we're more refined than that (at last before the sun's under the yard arm, me hearties!).

Anna Campbell said...

Donna, it's quite eerie how they always let you know, isn't it? And they do INDEED let you know!

Anna Campbell said...

Snort to the Gaga elevation!

Anna Campbell said...

I've always liked Duncan too (like Scottish names). And yes, he IS a Scot. So my heroine. She's going to be Ailsa. I seem to like girls' names that start with A. Well, of course I do! ;-) Duncan's a mere sir so no need to come up with a title although I haven't yet got him a surname.

Anna Campbell said...

Seriously thinking of making the bad guy Colin after today's discusion. I think it would be therapeutic!

Jeanne (AKA The Duchesse) said...

Anna said: I nearly always had luck of various sorts with men called Mark, yet for some reason I can't imagine calling a hero that. It's interesting, isn't it?

Oddly enough, all the Marks die in my books...hmmmmm....wonder what THAT means....snork.

Anna Campbell said...

Sheila, those blue sheets do draw the eye, don't they? Not to mention his lovely back!

Anna Campbell said...

Christine, lovely to see you! You write a lovely Sebastian. Aren't the captions a hoot?

Anna Campbell said...

Jennifer, lovely to see you here! I think the Dangerous Viscount is going to be a great read. He's still swimming down the Pacific to get to me, sadly!

Anna Campbell said...

Snort to Nigel not having any hormones! Poor Nigel!

Anna Campbell said...

Laurie, so glad to meet another fan of the nerdy hero. Susan Elizabeth Phillips occasionally does a nerd as a secondary romance and they're always such fun! Laughed at you saying I torture my heroes to the edge of infinity too. Bwahahahahahaha!

Anna Campbell said...

I don't know - Oonagh always had a lovely soft Irish lilt to me! ;-)

Anna Campbell said...

Miranda, have you been drinkin', hon? Getting in practice for all the rum on the Revenge? A NICE person? Bwahahahahahahaha!

Anna Campbell said...

I made Jeanne spit coffee on her keyboard? My work is done! ;-)

Anna Campbell said...

Jeanne, I think all your Marks have a...MARK AGAINST THEM!!!!

Oh, dear, time I went and had lunch.

Miranda Neville said...

I think it's time I went to bed. I need to get up early so I can obsessively worry about whether my books are in stores or lost in a lorry (British word alert) somewhere in the midwest.

Thank you dear Anna and the Banditas for inviting me here. I always have a wonderful time. And I'll be getting those prize books out just as soon as I know the names and addresses of the winners.

Good night!

Anna Campbell said...

Thanks, Miranda and everyone, for a great day in the lair. A bit of silly artwork always works, doesn't it?

Don't forget to check back to see who won the BOOKS!!!!

PJ said...

Sorry I wasn't around to play today. Congrats on the new release, Miranda! It sounds wonderful!

Have to join the others on the name, Nigel. Nope, just doesn't do it for me.

Louisa, congrats on nabbing the chook!

Pat Cochran said...

Anna, I'm late again!! So sorry!

One name I've not ever seen in
use for a heroine is my first
name: Patricia. It must have
been in favor in 1936 because
there were 5 Patricias/Patsys
in one of my HS English classes!
Percy or Percival, definitely
not a favorite for a hero.

We had much fun in suggesting
names for the grandchildren.
They turned out to be Ashley
Eileen, Taylor Orion, Paul Alan,
Julia Michelle, Morgan Scott
Mason Alexander, Abbey Elaine,
Sadie Mackenzie, Tristan Blake,
and Jude Harrison. Helping name these "characters" gave us great
enjoyment!

Pat Cochran

Anna Campbell said...

Miranda, looks like Nigel is out! PJ agrees!

PJ, we've had great fun today. Glad you could make it!

Anna Campbell said...

Pat, better late than never ;-)

Love the names you came up with for the grandchildren. As I said, naming my characters is part of the process I always enjoy!